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FROM THIS EPISODE

Americans have access to more news sources than ever before, but they read, watch or listen most to the ones they trust. Liberals and conservatives make very different choices — reinforced by the influence of social media.

Also, a fugitive Mexican Mayor, suspected in the abduction of missing students, is captured. On today’s Talking Point, is Blue American turning against football? 

Photo: New York Times/Alexander Torrenegra; Fox News/Clemens v. Vogelsang

Producers:
Evan George
Katie Cooper

Fugitive Mexican Mayor, Suspected in Abduction of Missing Students, Is Captured 6 MIN, 7 SEC

It’s been more than a month since 43 students were last seen when police led them away from a protest in Iguala, a city in Mexico’s Guerrero province.  Iguala’s Mayor immediately took a leave of absence and disappeared with his wife, but they were arrested this morning in Mexico City.  Tracy Wilkinson is Bureau Chief there for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times (@TracyKWilkinson)

All the News that Fits… What You’re Already Thinking… 35 MIN, 59 SEC

Increased partisanship in politics is no accident.  The far Left and the far Right live in different worlds when it comes to news and information. Intense conservatives trust Fox News -- not MSNBC, the New York Times or NPR.  For intense liberals, it’s the other way around.  And social media deliver more and more news -- using algorithms based on what consumers have already indicated they “like.” Are political echo chambers creating opinion bubbles that kill public discourse? 

Guests:
John Avlon, Daily Beast (@JohnAvlon)
Amy Mitchell, Pew Research Center (@asmitch)
Mollie Hemingway, The Federalist (@MZHemingway)
Sean Munson, University of Washington (@smunson)

More:
Pew Research Center on political polarization and media habits

Wingnuts

John Avlon

Football, the Newest Partisan Divide 7 MIN, 24 SEC

Football is still a secular religion in much of the country, but skeptics and dissenters are beginning to appear — with the dividing line parallel to what separates political partisans.  That’s according to David Leonhardt, former Washington Bureau Chief for the New York Times, now Editor of the paper's news and data project, The Upshot.

Guests:
David Leonhardt, New York Times (@DLeonhardt)

More:
RAND poll on parents' attitudes toward their children playing football

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