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FROM THIS EPISODE

President Obama is taking personal responsibility for deciding which terrorist suspect on a so-called "kill list" will live or die. His use of drone technology goes well beyond what the Bush Administration even tried. What are the consequences in the law, for morality, international diplomacy and the upcoming election? Also, the SpaceX Dragon capsule returns to Earth, and "Flame," the latest — and biggest — computer virus so far.

Banner image: President Barack Obama listens during one in a series of meetings discussing the mission against Osama bin Laden, in the Situation Room of the White House, May 1, 2011. Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

Producers:
Anna Scott
Caitlin Shamberg
Gideon Brower

Making News SpaceX Dragon Capsule Returns to Earth 7 MIN, 24 SEC

For the first time in history, a privately built and operated spacecraft has completed its mission. The Dragon capsule produced by Space X splashed down in the Pacific Ocean this morning after last week's rendezvous with the International Space Station. Bill Hennigan is aerospace writer for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
Bill Hennigan, Los Angeles Times (@wjhenn)

Main Topic Obama the Warrior in a New Kind of War 37 MIN, 54 SEC

Soon after President Obama won the Nobel Peace Prize, he began authorizing the killing of individuals deemed threatening to the United States. Now he presides over regular meetings that determine which terrorist suspects will live or die, along with others who may become "collateral damage." New drone technology allows precise targeting, but what about the laws of war, the crossing of international boundaries and basic morality? In this election year, we hear why Republicans and Democrats are calling Obama "Bush-Cheney on steroids."

Guests:
Jo Becker, New York Times (@jo_becker)
William Banks, Syracuse University
Glenn Greenwald, Salon.com (@ggreenwald)
Audrey Kurth Cronin, George Mason University

How Terrorism Ends

Audrey Kurth Cronin

Reporter's Notebook 'Flame' Computer Virus, a Tool for Espionage 5 MIN, 12 SEC

Flame is "pretty fantastic and incredible in its complexity," according to the chief of security at Russia's Kaspersky Lab. The latest virus to turn up in computers around the world can swipe documents, recorded conversations and keystrokes from infected programs, and allow attackers to "tweak the toolkit and add new functionality." Kim Zetter who writes the "Threat Level" blog for Wired magazine, has more on the latest in espionage and cyberwarfare.

Guests:
Kim Zetter, Reporter, Wired magazine (@KimZetter)

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