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Photo: President Trump announces H.R. McMaster as his National Security Advisor, February 20, 2017

Trudeau says Canada will continue to accept asylum seekers 6 MIN, 31 SEC

Refugees who've come to the US from Africa and the Middle East are trekking through snow for asylum in Canada. Yesterday, Prime Minister Trudeau said the door will stay open because Canadians trust their immigration system -- but that doesn't mean there are no political problems. Andrea Hopkins, Ottawa Bureau Chief for Reuters, has more on the increase of refugees into Canada from the United States -- including many who have lived in the US for many years, and the "Safe Third Country Agreement."

Guests:
Andrea Hopkins, Reuters (@andrealhopkins)

America's new president baffles the world 34 MIN, 8 SEC

When it comes to foreign policy, the Trump Administration is speaking with many voices. In Europe last weekend, Vice President Pence and Defense Secretary Mattis had different messages. Secretary of State Tillerson has said almost nothing at all. And nobody knows what President Trump knows -- or whether he'll set the US in new and different directions with unexpected tweets or unscripted comments. He's already had to replace one National Security Advisor with another as the administration veers between traditional positions and radical change.

Guests:
Ken Thomas, Associated Press (@kthomasdc)
Robin Wright, US Institute of Peace / Woodrow Wilson Center (@wrightr)
Michael Auslin, American Enterprise Institute / Wall Street Journal (@michaelauslin)
Dan De Luce, Foreign Policy magazine (@dandeluce)

More:
Thomas on VP Pence trying to reassure European leaders shaken by Trump
Wright on Trump's flailing foreign policy bewildering the world
De Luce on McMaster's having to vie for influence with ideologues like Stephen Bannon
Auslin on the logic of Trump's foreign policy

Is CPAC 2017 betraying its roots? 8 MIN, 59 SEC

The Conservative Political Action Conference dates back to the 1960s, when it started out as a fringe movement trying to influence the Republican Party. It became America's largest annual gathering of right-wing intellectuals, with the capacity to draw some 10,000 people. As it begins this year's session today, it's showing how much the conservative movement has been influenced by Donald Trump and political theater. We hear more about what's happened to CPAC from Mona Charen, a syndicated columnist and senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Institute.

Guests:
Mona Charen, Ethics and Public Policy Institute / National Review Online (@monacharenEPPC)

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