ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

The Obama Administration appears to be distancing itself from Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, after 30 years of support in the name of "regional stability." In Cairo, protesters are defying another afternoon curfew with no opposition as yet from Egyptian troops, and there's talk of turning millions of people into the street tomorrow. Also, the accelerating growth of mixed-race Americans.

Banner image: Protestors carry a large Egyptian flag through Tahrir Square on January 31, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Producers:
Sonya Geis
Katie Cooper
Karen Radziner

Main Topic Unrest in Egypt: Should the US Take Sides? 43 MIN, 54 SEC

Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak has reorganized his government, but protest leaders plan a "million man march" tomorrow to demand that he step down. Yesterday, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton appeared on several weekend news programs to talk about the Obama Administration's evolving position on the crisis. Protestors denounce the Administration's call for "an orderly transfer of power" as "hypocrisy." But would pushing Mubarak out provide a path for democracy or an opportunity for some new form of tyranny, perhaps one like that of Iran? In the meantime, will Mubarak order the riot police and the Army to crack down? After supporting an increasingly unpopular despot for 30 years, what can the US do now to stay on "the right side of history?"  

Guests:
Nicholas Kristof, New York Times (@NickKristof)
David Sanger, New York Times (@SangerNYT)
Leslie Gelb, Council on Foreign Relations (@CFR_org)
Shadi Hamid, Brookings Doha Center (@shadihamid)
Fawaz Gerges, London School of Economics and Politics

The Inheritance

David E. Sanger

Reporter's Notebook Accelerating Growth of Mixed-Race Americans 7 MIN, 6 SEC

Immigration and intermarriage are changing the population of the United States. One of the fastest growing demographic groups is multi-racial Americans. Mixed-race marriages used to be illegal in some states.  Now, one in seven new marriages is between spouses of different races or ethnicities. That's according to the Pew Research Center, which has analyzed data from 2008 and 2009. Mixed-race statistics from last year's census will be released, state by state, in the next few months. Jeffrey Passel is senior demographer at the Pew Hispanic Center.

Guests:
Jeffrey Passel, Pew Hispanic Center (@PewHispanic)

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK