ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

It's already down to the wire for the Department of Homeland Security. Republicans are divided over a partial shutdown, and Democrats are refusing to allow a challenge to the President's actions on immigration.

Also, Southwest Airlines is flying planes that missed inspections, and the latest advice for avoiding peanut allergies in young children is… feed them peanuts.

Photo: Jared and Corin

More:
The Hill on Senate advancing clean DHS bill

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Evan George
Katie Cooper

Southwest Airlines Is Flying Planes that Missed Inspections 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Southwest Airlines canceled 80 flights yesterday after reporting that it failed to perform mandatory rudder inspections on 128 of its planes.  But the FAA was willing to make a deal: the jets can keep flying, as Andy Pasztor reports in the Wall Street Journal.

Playing Politics with Homeland Security 36 MIN, 1 SEC

Just hours after Republicans won control of the Senate last November, the new Majority Leader Mitch McConnell promised no more government shutdowns. But the budget for the Department of Homeland Security still hasn't passed — and the current money runs out on Friday. Republicans are divided over what to do to protest the President's unilateral action on immigration. At stake is the budget for Homeland Security -- including the Border Patrol, the Coast Guard and the TSA. Democrats are warning about a terrorist threat to Minnesota's Mall of America and the need for FEMA workers in the snowbound Northeast. It's politics and public safety with time running out: the deadline is Friday. 

Guests:
Bob Cusack, The Hill (@BobCusack)
Michael Needham, Heritage Action for America (@MikeNeedham)
Jonathan Tobin, Commentary magazine (@TobinCommentary)
Gary Segura, Latino Decisions (@GarySegura)

More:
The Hill on House GOP split on clean DHS funding

How Eating Peanuts Can Prevent Peanut Allergies 7 MIN, 21 SEC

Since 2006, parents whose children are high-risk for peanut allergy have been told to keep them away from peanuts until they turned three. Now a study that's being called "revolutionary," tells parents to do just the reverse.

This week, the New England Journal of Medicine published results from the most extensive study of peanut allergy ever conducted. It involved 640 children over four years. Some specialists in allergy immunology are calling it "mind blowing," as we hear from Jennifer Couzin-Frankel, a staff writer at Science magazine.

Guests:
Jennifer Couzin-Frankel, Science Magazine (@sciencemagazine)

More:
KIngs College study on changes in peanut allergy prevalence in different ethnic groups

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED