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FROM THIS EPISODE

President Bush is in Jordan for talks with Iraq's Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, who's been jolted by new challenges to his leadership and his diplomatic credibility.  Does al-Maliki have the power to control his own country?  Would more American troops make a difference?  We look at the withdrawal of crucial support for al-Maliki's government and the options available for new American policies. Plus, how explosive-sniffing honeybees might help in war and homeland security.

Producers:
Vanessa Romo
Dan Konecky
Frances Anderton

Main Topic New Stumbling Blocks for Crisis Diplomacy 34 MIN, 38 SEC

Just hours before his meeting with President Bush, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki was hit by two challenges to his leadership of Iraq. The first was a leaked memo from National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley saying al-Maliki is either unwilling or unable to control sectarian violence; the second, withdrawal from al-Maliki's government by a key bloc of supporters led by Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr.  How damaged is al-Maliki's leadership of his own divided country?  Would more American troops make a difference?

Guests:
Bobby Ghosh, Time Magazine (@ghoshworld)
Noah Feldman, Professor of Law, Harvard University
Laith Kubba, Spokesman, former Iraqi Prime Minister al-Jaafari
Barry McCaffrey, Former Commander, US Southern Command

Making News In Jordan, Bush Still Supporting al-Maliki 6 MIN, 12 SEC

In a "secret" memo leaked to the New York Times today, National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley says Prime Minister al-Maliki may lack the capacity--or the will--to control sectarian violence.  The memo says al-Maliki is either "ignorant... of the reality on the streets of Baghdad," misrepresenting his own intentions or unable to turn them into effective action.

Guests:
Peter Wallsten, Washington Post (@peterwallsten)

Reporter's Notebook Los Alamos Develops Bomb-Detecting Bees 8 MIN, 28 SEC

Los Alamos is best known as the place where the Atomic Bomb was developed and where research on nuclear weapons has continued ever since.  It's also home to the Stealthy Insect Sensor Project.  The stealthy insects are honeybees, and the project is training them to detect explosives.  Researchers at the project say they're "very excited" about training honeybees to detect explosives in cars, roadside bombs and belts similar to those used by suicide bombers.

Guests:
Tim Haarmann, Principal Investigator for the Stealthy Insect Sensor Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

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