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FROM THIS EPISODE

President Obama made his second major speech to the UN General Assembly today. We hear different opinions about what he said about US engagement with the rest of the world and what he left out. Also, Republicans unveil their "Pledge to America," and a new study on the need for mammograms to detect breast cancer.

Banner image: Barack Obama, President of the United States of America, addresses the general debate of the sixty-fifth session of the General Assembly on September 23, 2010. UN Photo: Rick Bajornas

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Karen Radziner
Sonya Geis

Main Topic President Obama Goes Back to the UN 35 MIN, 39 SEC

Last year, in his first speech to the UN General Assembly, President Obama promised a new era of American engagement with the rest of the world. Today, he emphasized peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians. Acknowledging widespread pessimism about the process, he encouraged drawing upon the "teachings of tolerance" of three great religions to realize a positive outcome. Though the President defended his record on Iran's nuclear program and healing the global economy, he had little to say about North Korea, Iraq's political instability or the shaky state of his counterinsurgency strategy in Afghanistan. We hear excerpts from his address, different opinions on its strengths and weaknesses and what else is going on in the halls of the United Nations. 

Guests:
Evelyn Leopold, Contributor, Huffington Post
David Rothkopf, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Richard Grenell, former Spokesman, US Ambassadors to the United Nations

Superclass

David Rothkopf

Making News Republicans Unveil Their 'Pledge to America' 7 MIN, 28 SEC

Republican leaders in Congress today unveiled what they call a "Pledge to America," promising to make government smaller, extending tax cuts and protecting entitlement programs at the same time. Jake Sherman reports for Politico.

Guests:
Jake Sherman, Politico (@JakeSherman)

Reporter's Notebook Breast Cancer Study Raises More Questions on Mammograms 7 MIN, 24 SEC

Last year an influential federal task force said routine annual mammograms were not necessary for women in their 40's. That led to concerns about insurance companies rationing medical services. Now a new study of 40,000 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Norway between 1986 and 2005 says treatment has advanced so much that mammograms may, indeed, not be so important. Sharon Begley is science editor of Newsweek magazine.

Guests:
Sharon Begley, Reuters (@sxbegle)

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