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FROM THIS EPISODE

For the second time, Democrat Hillary Clinton is making her case to be America's first woman president. We hear how she—and Republican Jeb Bush — deal with years of familiarity. 

Also, Rachel Dolezal resigns her post at the NAACP. On today's Talking Point, gender inequality in the sports world.   

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Christine Detz
Jenny Hamel

Rachel Dolezal Resigns Her NAACP Post 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Rachel Dolezal has resigned as President of the Spokane, Washington chapter of the NAACP.  She’s been a subject of controversy since her parents revealed that her heritage is Czech, Swedish and German — with possible traces of Native American.  She is not African-American, as she has claimed for the past 10 years. Jamelle Bouie covers politics policy and race for Slate.com.

Guests:
Jamelle Bouie, Slate (@jbouie)

More:
NAACP on Dolezal resignation

Presidential Politics and Family History 35 MIN, 59 SEC

Bill Clinton staked out the political center, appealing to undecided voters and even Republicans. Hillary’s going the other direction. Saturday, in the first major policy speech of her presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton talked about income inequality and education, saying GOP hopefuls "believe in yesterday."

Can the former Secretary of State, US Senator and First Lady bring out the base of her own party, including blacks and Latinos? Also today, Republican Jeb Bush is formally declaring his candidacy -- with new branding that drops his last name. Can a Clinton or a Bush meet the challenge of voters who might be looking for something new?

Guests:
Amy Chozick, New York Times (@amychozick)
Emanuel Cleaver, US House of Representatives (@repcleaver )
James Taranto, Wall Street Journal (@jamestaranto‎)
Allida Black, Virginia Leadership Council / Hillary for Virginia Leadership Council (@allidablack)
Andra Gillespie, Emory University (@AndraGillespie)

More:
Chozick on Clinton policy speech, attempt to contrast herself with Obama

The New Black Politician

Andra Gillespie

Women's World Cup: Is It a Feminist Issue? 7 MIN, 22 SEC

Gender discrimination is a major issue, especially in magazines and web sites that focus on women's issues. So, why don't they have more to say about what's happening in Canada, where world-class women athletes are playing in conditions that wouldn't be tolerated for men. FIFA, the governing board of professional soccer, is being sued by some of the best women athletes on the planet for gender discrimination at the Women's World Cup, being played in Canada on artificial turf. Maggie Mertens is a journalist and author of an article in the Atlantic titled, "Womens Soccer Is a Feminist Issue."


Photo by Mack Male

Guests:
Maggie Mertens, journalist and writer (@maggiejmertens)

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