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FROM THIS EPISODE

Last night's Democratic presidential debate was the liveliest yet. Was Hillary Clinton damaged? Is Mike Huckabee making strides on the Republican side? Is either party telling angry voters what they want to hear? Also, verdicts in the 2004 Madrid subway bombing, and what the Federal Reserve did today about interest rates.


Photo: Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Andrea Brody
Christian Bordal

Main Topic Presidential Race Livens Up on Both Sides 36 MIN, 36 SEC

Enshrined as the Democratic front-runner by the media and by Republicans Hillary Clinton was on the defensive in last night's debateJohn Edwards accused her of double-talk and representing the status quo. Barack Obama called her secretive—like George Bush. Will the predicted confrontations make a difference? Is Clinton's lead really all that solid? On the Republican side, can born-again conservative Mike Huckabee make a run at Rudy Giuliani? In a little over eight weeks, voters in Iowa and New Hampshire will finally be heard from.  Is either party speaking to the anger of voters two months before they start going to the polls?

Guests:
Lynn Sweet, Washington Bureau Chief, Chicago Sun-Times
Walter Shapiro, Yahoo News and Columbia Journalism Review (@waltershapiroPD)
Ana Iparraguirre, Senior Associate, Greenberg Quinlan Rosner
David Yepsen, Paul Simon Public Policy Institute (@DavidYepsen)
Dean Spiliotes, Civic Scholar, Southern New Hampshire University

Reporter's Notebook The Fed Lowers Interest Rates 6 MIN, 37 SEC

Despite strains in the housing and credit markets, the economy picked up speed this summer, growing at 3.9%, the fastest rate in one and a half years. Nonetheless, the Federal Reserve was widely expected to lower interest rates at today's meeting and it did—by.25% to 4.5%. We find out why from Peter Coy, economics editor at BusinessWeek.

Guests:
Peter Coy, Bloomberg BusinessWeek

Making News Suspects in Madrid Subway Bombing Sentenced 5 MIN, 53 SEC

Three years ago, four terrorist bombs killed 191 people on the Madrid subway. Today, after four and a half months of testimony from 300 witnesses, three lead defendants and 18 lesser ones were convicted. But seven were acquitted, including all three of those accused of organizing the attacks. Giles Tremlett, a former reporter for the Guardian, is author of Ghosts of Spain.

Guests:
Giles Tremlett, The Guardian and The Ecomomist (@gilestremlett)

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