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FROM THIS EPISODE

Tahrir Square filled with protesters again today. We look at the role of the Internet in the ongoing challenge to Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak. Also, NASA has completed its study of Toyotas recalled for sudden acceleration. We hear its conclusions.

Banner image: Wael Ghonim greets thousands of anti-government protesters in Tahrir Square on February 8, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Released by police yesterday after nearly two weeks in custody, the Google marketing executive has acknowledged that he was the anonymous administrator of the Facebook page that sparked the protests in Egypt. Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

Producers:
Sonya Geis
Katie Cooper
Karen Radziner

Reporter's Notebook Feds Blame Toyota Acceleration Incidents on Mechanical Issues 5 MIN, 13 SEC

Two years ago, after thousands of complaints about unintended acceleration, Toyota recalled nearly 8 million vehicles and paid a record $49 million in fines. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration hired NASA to investigate Toyota's problems and, today, NASA released its findings. Matt DeBord, who covers the auto industry for several national publications, including BNET, has more on today's report.

Guests:
Matt DeBord, is Transportation Editor for Business Insider (@mattdebord)

Making News Massive Crowds Back in Tahrir Square 7 MIN, 38 SEC

The government of Egypt has promised reforms, but protesters are still saying that Mubarak has to go. Today's crowd in Cairo was one of the biggest so far. Matt Bradley was there for the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Matt Bradley, Wall Street Journal (@MattMcBradley)

Main Topic Egypt, the Internet and Political Change 37 MIN, 31 SEC

Another enormous crowd turned out in Tahrir Square today, celebrating Google executive Wael Ghonim, who says he created a crucial Facebook page last June. It was dedicated to a victim of police brutality, and encouraged Internet users to share their anger. Now it's credited with starting the protests we see today. But is the Internet necessarily an instrument of democracy? Can it also be used by authoritarian regimes to enforce the status quo? We hear more about its role in Egypt, and how it's used in Iran and China. How is it regulated in the US? Should the government have a "kill switch," just in case?

Guests:
Rasha Abdulla, American University in Cairo (@RashaAbdulla)
Rebecca MacKinnon, New America Foundation (@rmack)
James Lewis, Center for Strategic and International Studies (@james_a_lewis)
Tim Wu, Columbia Law School

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