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Photo: Defense Secretary James Mattis (C) and Joint Chiefs Chairman General Joseph Dunford (R) depart after briefing members of the US Senate on North Korea at the White House in Washington, April 26, 2017. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

How would Trump re-negotiate NAFTA, "the worst trade deal ever"? 6 MIN, 31 SEC

During his campaign, Donald Trump called NAFTA "one of the worst trade deals ever made." Yesterday, his staff said he was ready to pull America out.  But after talking last night with Canada’s Prime Minister and Mexico’s President, today said, "So they asked me to renegotiate I will and I think we'll be successful in the renegotiation which frankly would be good because it would be simpler. But we have to make a deal that's fair for the United States ...they understand that." Shawn Donnan, world trade editor for the Financial Times, reports on Trump's change of heart.

Guests:
Shawn Donnan, Financial Times (@sdonnan)

North Korea: Are US provocations making things better or worse? 40 MIN, 15 SEC

As North Korea continues its nuclear program, the Trump Administration says it's lost its "strategic patience." What does that mean? A US carrier and a nuclear submarine are conducting drills in the Western Pacific, and China is urging President Trump to exercise "restraint." The entire US Senate was bussed from Capitol Hill to the White House. Was it political theater or did they learn anything new? We hear about possible options from diplomacy to economic sanctions to preventative war. 

Guests:
Michael Crowley, Politico (@MichaelCrowley)
Philip Yun, Ploughshares Foundation (@PhilipYun_PF)
Bruce Klingner, Heritage Foundation (@BruceKlingner)
Peter Beinart, City University of New York / Atlantic (@PeterBeinart)

More:
Politico on Trump and North Korea
Ploughshares on North Korea
Klingner on Trump's North Korea policy
Beinart on how Trump could get China's help on North Korea

Spacecraft Cassini's grand finale 9 MIN, 59 SEC

The Cassini spacecraft is one of NASA’s greatest achievements… exploration of the planet Saturn, its moons and its rings. But all good things much come to an end. After 20 years in space, Cassini is running out of fuel.


NASA's Cassini spacecraft is shown heading toward the gap between
Saturn and its rings in this artist's rendering.
Illustration by NASA/JPL-Caltech

But last night, just before midnight at the Jet Propulsion Lab in California, Cassini chalked up another accomplishment as the spacecraft passed between Saturn and its closest ring for the first time. Astrophysicist and science writer Ian O'Neill reflects on what he calls a "bittersweet ending."

Guests:
Ian O'Neill, astrophysicist and science writer (@astroengine)

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