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FROM THIS EPISODE

Reports that the US bugged the embassies of friendly nations are threatening a massive trade deal between the US and the European Union. We hear about Edward Snowden's latest revelations. When it comes to secret intelligence, how much is too much to protect the nation's security?  Also, a year after Mohammed Morsi became Egypt's first elected president, millions are back in the streets demanding that he step down, and the Army has issued an ultimatum of its own.

Banner image: A television screens the image of former US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden during a news bulletin at a cafe at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport June 26, 2013. Photo: Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters

Producers:
Caitlin Shamberg
Anna Scott
Sonya Geis

Making News Egyptian Army Issues Ultimatum as Protests Continue 23 MIN, 20 SEC

Two years ago, millions of street protesters forced Egyptian dictator Hosni Mubarak to step down, and the Army seized governmental control. A year later, Mohammed Morsi became Egypt's first elected president, but now millions are back in the streets demanding that he step down, and the Army has issued an ultimatum of its own. We hear from Cairo.

Guests:
David Kirkpatrick, New York Times (@ddknyt)
Hazem Cashlan, Cairo University Hospital
Thanassis Cambanis, Century Foundation (@tcambanis)

Main Topic Secrecy, Diplomacy and Edward Snowden 27 MIN, 17 SEC

Edward Snowden says he went to work for a defense contractor so he could inform the American public about the government's secret surveillance of telephone and Internet conversations. Having fled from Hong Kong, he's still thought to be in the Moscow airport. Over the weekend, London's Guardian newspaper and Der Spiegel in Germany published new revelations that the US has spied on allies as well as enemies. Angry leaders in Europe say that could scuttle a trade deal between the US and the European Union — the biggest ever negotiated. Does the US keep more secrets than it needs to for national security? Should whistle-blowers be prosecuted or protected?

Guests:
Peter Spiegel, Financial Times (@SpiegelPeter)
PJ Crowley, George Washington University (@PJCrowley)
Geoffrey Stone, University of Chicago
Jeff Bachman, American University (@americanu)

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