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FROM THIS EPISODE

Thirty years ago, America's upset military defeat produced what came to be called "Vietnam Syndrome." Acknowledging failure brought angry recriminations and second-guessing that still effect public opinion, politics and foreign policy. Will Iraq Syndrome have a deeper and longer-lasting impact on the national psyche and US prestige in the world? Also, the latest on developments in the Palestinian Territories.  We hear from Gaza, the West Bank and Israel. Does the US still have a role?

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Christian Bordal
Katie Cooper
Karen Radziner

Main Topic Post-Iraq Syndrome

Defeat in war can have "unintended, seemingly inexplicable consequences." Upset defeats can be especially damaging to a nation's psyche. Thirty years ago, what came to be called Vietnam Syndrome has divided America for decades, with profound consequences for its politics and conduct of foreign policy. Will "Iraq Syndrome" have similar and longer-lasting consequences? What about US prestige and effectiveness in the rest of the world?

Guests:
Christopher Fettweis, Assistant Professor ot National Security Affairs at the US Navel War College
Fouad Ajami, Stanford University
Peter Galbraith, former Deputy Special Representative in Afghanistan for the UN Secretary General
Douglas Murray, Centre for Social Cohesion

Making News Two Palestines?

After a week of fighting that killed at least 100 people, an "uneasy calm" is reported today in the Gaza Strip.  Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has appointed a new prime minister, but Ismail Haniyeh says he still holds that office.  In any case, Haniyeh's Hamas faction now has total control in Gaza, with Abbas' authority now limited to the West Bank.

Guests:
Hazem Abu Shanab, Palestinian political analyst
Sari Nusseibeh, President, Al Quds University
Yossi Alpher, Co-Editor, BitterLemons.org
Robert Malley, International Crisis Group (@CrisisGroup)

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