ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

US companies complain about higher taxes at home than abroad, and a growing number are fleeing to other countries to save their investors money. They may be housed in Pittsburgh, Cleveland or Boston, but they want to pay taxes in Ireland or the Netherlands. President Obama calls that “unpatriotic,” and he’s threatening executive action — which may be what caused Walgreen to change its plans. It might be good politics for Democrats in an election year, but Republicans say it’s another way of avoiding comprehensive tax reform.

Also, Russian surprises its neighbor Ukraine with an aid convoy, and the ride-sharing rivalry between Lyft and Uber heats up.

Banner Image Credit: Pixabay

Producers:
Evan George
Benjamin Gottlieb
Claire Martin

Massive Russian Aid Convoy Heads for Rebel-Held Ukraine 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Once again, Russia has surprised its neighbor Ukraine — this time with a mile-long convoy of 280 trucks that left Moscow today. Initially, Ukraine was highly suspicious that humanitarian aid might be a cover for military intention. Michael Birnbaum is Moscow Bureau Chief for the Washington Post. He’s currently in Kiev, Ukraine.

Guests:
Michael Birnbaum, Washington Post (@michaelbirnbaum)

Can Corporations Be Patriots? 36 MIN, 15 SEC

Congress adjourned for the summer with tax reform still caught in political gridlock. Since then, President Obama has seized on a tax proposal once buried in his budget to attack a practice multi-national companies use to avoid paying taxes in the US; it’s called “corporate inversion.”

Guests:
Richard Rubin, Bloomberg News (@RichardRubinDC)
Robert Reich, University of California, Berkeley (@RBReich)
James Taranto, Wall Street Journal (@jamestaranto‎)
Jonathan Alter, MSNBC (@jonathanalter)

The Ride-Sharing Rivalry Between Uber and Lyft Heats Up 7 MIN, 7 SEC

The fight between Apple and Google is old news; the latest tech battle in San Francisco is between Lyft and Uber. And, just as it is with the communications giants, so it is with the transportation rivals: their war has spread to dozens of other cities.

Lyft and Uber are competing with taxis, buses and trains to provide transportation in America’s urban centers. They’re also competing—with increasing intensity—with each other. That’s according to Douglas MacMillan of the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Douglas MacMillan, Wall Street Journal (@dmac1)

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER