ON AIR STAR

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

The American Cancer Society has changed its recommended age for women to start getting annual mammograms from 40 to 45. That's caused uncertainty for young women and doctors. What's worse, the risk of false positives that lead to fear and unnecessary treatments or the risk of death?

Later on the program, police chiefs and prosecutors from all over the country met at the White House to advocate a new strategy for the war on crime: send fewer people to jails and prisons — while making America safer. 

Photo: National Cancer Institute

Producers:
Jenny Hamel
Katie Cooper
Sarah Sweeney

Historic Hurricane Bearing Down on Mexico 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Hurricane Patricia today became the strongest storm ever recorded in the Western hemisphere with top winds of 200 miles an hour. As it headed toward the Pacific Coast of Mexico, residents and tourists prepared for the worst. Jeff Masters, director of meteorology for Weather Underground.com, has an updates.

Guests:
Jeff Masters, WeatherUnderground.com (@wunderground)

New Guidelines Create Confusion about Mammograms 33 MIN, 24 SEC

Breast cancer kills 41,000 American women every year, but hundreds of thousands survive — largely because of early diagnosis. One big question is, how early? Mammograms can save lives, but can also generate "false positives" that lead to further tests and treatments that could be unnecessary. Now, after years of recommending annual mammograms starting at age 40, the American Cancer Society says 45. But other agencies disagree, leaving questions of life or death up to individual women and their doctors.

Guests:
Melinda Beck, Wall Street Journal (@MelindaBeckWSJ)
Robert A. Smith, American Cancer Society (@americancancer)
Xeni Jardin, BoingBoing.net (@xeni)
Christine Dauphine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (@cdauphinemd)

More:
Beck on new mammogram guidelines for breast-cancer screening
Beck on large study that raises doubts about the value of mammograms

Law Enforcement, Prosecutors Call for Cuts to Incarceration 9 MIN, 57 SEC

The US now imprisons more people than any other country, but mass incarceration is not making America safer. That's the conclusion of 130 police chiefs, prosecutors and other law enforcement leaders from around the country who gathered yesterday at the White House to advocate a major change in direction for America's War on Crime. Benjamin David is District Attorney for New Hanover and Pender Counties in North Carolina and a member of Law Enforcement Leaders to Reduce Crime and Incarceration.

Guests:
Benjamin David, Law Enforcement Leaders to Reduce Crime and Incarceration (@LawLeadGroup)

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED