ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

The prime suspect in the anthrax letters episode committed suicide, so he'll never be tried, but the Justice Department says he was guilty "beyond a reasonable doubt." What's the evidence? Is it certain Dr. Bruce Ivins acted alone? Has the investigation made the country safer from biological terrorism? Also, President Bush criticizes China on the eve of the Olympics, and it's unclear who's in charge of Detroit today.  There is no Deputy Mayor, and Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick has been sent to jail.


Banner image: Joseph Persichini (C), Assistant Director in Charge of the FBI's Washington Field Office, with Jeff Taylor US Attorney for the District of Columbia (L), and Chief Postal Inspector Alexander Lazaroff of the US Postal Service (R), explains recent developments in the government's Amerithrax case

Producers:
Gary Scott
Dan Konecky
Katie Cooper
Karen Radziner

Reporter's Notebook Detroit Mayor Ordered To Jail 7 MIN, 32 SEC

The Mayor of Detroit, Kwame Kilpatrick, faces felony charges, including misconduct in office.  He was free on his own recognizance until last week, when Wayne County officials claimed he assaulted them when they tried to serve a subpoena. Today, Kilpatrick's $7500 cash bond was revoked and he was sent to jail for leaving the country without permission. It's not clear who's running the city.  Reporter Jim Schaefer of the Detroit Free Press was in the courtroom today.

Guests:
Jim Schaefer, Reporter, Detroit Free Press

Making News Bush Criticizes China on Eve of the Olympics 5 MIN, 59 SEC

President Bush has arrived in Beijing for the opening of the Olympics, after a speech in Bangkok, praising Thailand as the "land of the free" and criticizing China's record on human rights. China responded by reminding the world it opposes outside interference when it comes to human rights.  Sheryl Gaye Stolberg covers the White House for the New York Times.

Guests:
Sheryl Gay Stolberg, New York Times (@sherylstolberg)

Main Topic Closing a Chapter on the 2001 Anthrax Scare 35 MIN, 25 SEC

At a news conference yesterday, the Justice Department said Dr. Bruce Ivins was the only person with access to the strain of anthrax that killed five and panicked the nation after September 11. It claimed FBI evidence would have proven him guilty beyond a reasonable doubt if he'd lived long enough to go on trial instead of committing suicide. Is the case against Ivins believable? Why did it take seven years? If Ivins suffered from mental illness for so long, why was he working with deadly toxins in a government laboratory?

Guests:
David Willman, Los Angeles Times
Meryl Nass, Physician, Mount Desert Island Hospital
Rush Holt, Congressman (D-NJ)
David Perlin, Interim Director of the Regional Biocontainment Laboratory at the International Center for Public Health, New Jersey Medical School
Jonathan Tucker, Professional Staff, Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction, Proliferation and Terrorism

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED