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FROM THIS EPISODE

The 50 states are central to America’s political system…but real power now lies in the growing metropolitan regions that cross state boundaries. We’ll hear how cities are getting together to overcome our national gridlock before unsolved problems reach the crisis stage.

Twitter trolls, status updates, and ALL THOSE cat videos – The Internet is vast. But is it art? We’ll talk with a cultural critic who says it’s THE great masterpiece of civilization.

Photo: Illustration from Parag Khanna's Connectography: Mapping the Future of Global Civilization

Producers:
Christine Detz
Evan George

Congress to Vote on Gun Measures 6 MIN, 29 SEC

This week House Republicans are slated to hold a vote on so-called “no fly, no buy” gun legislation -- just holding a vote is an about-face for GOP leadership. It comes after Democrats staged their 25 hour sit-in on the floor of Congress last month. But the bill being offered by the Republicans falls short of what Democrats wanted.

Following all the back and forth on Capitol Hill is Paul Singer, Washington correspondent for USA Today.

Guests:
Paul Singer, USA Today (@singernews)

More:
Singer's USA Today article: "That Day I Became a Democratic Stooge"

Will the United States Become the United Cities of America? 32 MIN, 53 SEC

The 50 United States are accidents of history, unrelated to current population density or productivity. They were never designed to solve today's problems. Now there's a movement for something new: connections across state borders between the vast metropolitan regions where power really lies. And cities around the world are getting together -- hoping to end national gridlock and address security, pandemic disease and climate change.

Guests:
Parag Khanna, global strategist and author (@paragkhanna)
Aaron Renn, Manhattan Institute (@urbanophile)
Benjamin Barber, Political theorist and author (@BenjaminRBarber)

More:
Barber's 'If Mayors Ruled the World: Dysfunctional Nations, Rising Cities'
Khanna on megacities as the world's most dominant, enduring social structures
Renn on rethinking American cities' success strategies

Connectography

Parag Khanna

Is the Internet Art? 10 MIN, 5 SEC

The Internet has “changed everything.” It’s so important in the development of civilization that it rivals monotheism. To understand it, we need “a new hierarchy of values.” All that’s according to Virginia Heffernan, former TV critic for the New York Times now a digital culture columnist. She’s author of a new book called Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art.

Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art 
Photo courtesy Simon & Schuster

Guests:
Virginia Hefferman, New York Times (@page88)

Magic and Loss

Virginia Heffernan

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