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Sixteen officers injured in police shooting aftermath 6 MIN, 23 SEC

Yesterday’s fatal shooting of a black man by police led to a night of widespread violence in Charlotte, North Carolina.  A woman calling herself the dead man’s daughter said he was un-armed and reading a book in his car. Her claim went viral. This morning, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney told reporters, "A weapon was seized -- a handgun.  I can also tell you we did not find a book that has been made reference to.  I can just tell you what I've gathered thru the scientific process of going thru the evidence and we did find a weapon and the weapon was there and the witnesses corroborated it too, just beyond the officers."

Tom Bullock, who reports for public radio station WFAE in North Carolina, updates the story.

Guests:
Tom Bullock, WFAE (@TomWFAE)

Seattle passes new scheduling rules to protect hourly workers 33 MIN, 55 SEC

The $15 hourly minimum wage got its start in Seattle. Now the city has taken a new step for part-time, low-wage workers who have to be on call whenever they're needed. In fast food and retail, algorithms determine when business will be hot or cold, and employers set work schedules without advance notice. What about the workers' needs: plans for childcare, time off for illness -- or additional part-time jobs that allow them to make ends meet. Seattle's new rules include two weeks' advance notice for work schedules and 10 hours' rest between shifts. Do employers accept them? Will they become a failed experiment or a model for the rest of the country? 

Guests:
Kshama Sawant, Seattle City Council (@cmkshama)
Darrion Sjoquist, former barista
Lizzy Simmons, National Retail Federation (@NRFnews)
Steven Greenhouse, journalist and author (@greenhousenyt)

More:
Washington Retail Association on Seattle's new scheduling ordinance

The Big Squeeze

Steven Greenhouse

The real threat of a refugee becoming a terrorist in the US 9 MIN, 31 SEC

A bowl of skittles — brightly colored, fruit-flavored candies — inspired a controversial meme-gone-viral by Donald Trump, Jr., son of the GOP Presidential nominee. He tweeted: "If I had a bowl of skittles and I told you just three would kill you. Would you take a handful? That's our Syrian refugee problem." 

 So how many skittles would it take to accurately reflect the chances of an American being killed by a Syrian refugee? We ask Alex Nowrasteh, an immigration policy analyst at the CATO Institute, the libertarian think-tank.

Guests:
Alex Nowrasteh, CATO Institute (@AlexNowrasteh)

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