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FROM THIS EPISODE

BP says it's responsible for whatever cleanup the Gulf oil spill requires. As the oil slick moves closer to show, we hear what could be in store for wildlife, economic interests and America's continuing appetite for energy. Also, the US and Iran joust over nuclear nonproliferation, and Greek unions respond to an international bailout by calling a general strike.'

Banner image: Mike Labat releases crabs back into the water after pulling the trap because of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on May 1, 2010 in Delacroix, Louisiana. As oil-polluted waters approach the Louisiana coast, fishermen don't want to take chances selling possibly contaminated crabs so they are pulling their traps and dumping their catches. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Gary Scott
Andrea Brody

Main Topic The Gulf Oil Spill: The Environment, the Economy and the Politics 36 MIN, 52 SEC

From the Gulf Coast to the White House to the offices of the British oil giant BP, the word is "unprecedented." Nobody's ever seen anything like this before. As an already massive slick moves toward the shoreline, it continues to grow -- and it may take weeks to shut off the gushers 5000 feet below. Just a month ago, President Obama lifted the moratorium on new off-shore drilling, saying a competitive economy still needs energy from fossil fuels. What's the worst-case scenario for wildlife, commercial fishing and recreation?  Will the impending disaster be bad enough to change the equation?

Guests:
Mark Schleifstein, Times-Picayune (@mschleifsteintp)
Rayola Dougher, Senior Economic Advisor, American Petroleum Institute
Tyson Slocum, Director of Public Citizen's Energy Program
Robert Bryce, Manhattan Institute (@pwrhungry)
Wesley Warren, Director of Programs, NRDC
Michael Levi, Council on Foreign Relations (@levi_m)

Making News US and Iran Joust over Nuclear Nonproliferation 7 MIN, 47 SEC

Delegates from France, Britain and the US walked out of today's UN conference on the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. They were protesting a speech by Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who, after attacking the US, made a veiled reference to western support for Israel's nuclear weapons. In Washington, the White House said Ahmadinejad failed to address Iran's obligations and accused him of "wild accusations."  Colum Lynch is UN correspondent for the Washington Post.

Guests:
Colum Lynch, Foreign Policy Magazine (@columlynch)

Reporter's Notebook Greece Tries to Avoid Bankruptcy at All Costs 6 MIN, 20 SEC

The heads of 16 European governments are scheduled to meet on Friday, to hasten release of 110 billion in Euros to bailout Greece and stabilize the currency. In Germany, there has been significant opposition to the bailout. In Greece itself, tough measures, including increased taxes and cuts in services, led to calls for a general strike on Wednesday. Nick Malkoutzis is deputy editor of the English of Kathimerini, a national newspaper.

Guests:
Nick Malkoutzis, Kathimerini (@NickMalkoutzis)

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