ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

SUPPORT KCRW!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

National security has been a Republican issue, but this year the Democrats are using it too. They're focusing on the war in Iraq, while the Republicans are talking "terror" and "Islamo-fascism." We look at the different language used by each party to generate anger and fear.  Also, is bad spinach from Salinas, California a sign of a bigger E. coli problem, and liberal and conservative churches are being warned that political activity can be a risk to their tax exemptions.

Making News Is Bad Spinach a Sign of a Wider E. Coli Problem? 6 MIN, 8 SEC

Federal officials have warned Americans not to eat any fresh spinach, whether it's loose or packaged, because of possible E. coli contamination.  At least 109 people in 19 states are sick because and one woman has died.  Like nine previous outbreaks over the past ten years, this most recent one appears to have its origin in Salinas, California.

Guests:
Michael Martinez, National Correspondent for the Chicago Tribune

Main Topic The Politics of Fear in an Election Year 34 MIN, 40 SEC

National security used to be a Republican issue, but this year, both parties are using it--in different ways.  Democrats want to talk about the war in Iraq.  Republicans have escalated their rhetoric from "terrorism" to what they call "Islamo-fascism."  We talk with some of the pollsters and strategists who advise candidates about the language they use to mobilize voters.  How does a single word or phrase reduce a complex set of facts to a simple fable?  Is this year's election all about fear?

Guests:
Frank Luntz, Head Consultant, The Word Doctors
Jeremy Rosner, Democratic pollster and strategist
Geoffrey Nunberg, Senior Researcher at Stanford University's Center for the Study of Language and Information
Gary LaFree, Director of the University of Maryland's National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism

Reporter's Notebook Churches and Partisan Politicking 8 MIN, 12 SEC

The IRS, which has investigated 200 organizations nationwide, has warned tax-exempt groups to stay neutral on politics. Yesterday, members of All Saints Episcopal Church in Pasadena, California told their pastor to defy IRS subpoenas based on an anti-war sermon two days before the last presidential election. Today, United for the Separation of Church and State, which wants churches in eight key states to help register voters for November's elections, warned churches to beware of partisan politicking that could affect their tax-exempt status.

Guests:
Joe Conn, Director of Communications for Americans United for Separation of Church and State

Events

View All Events

New Episodes

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER