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North Dakota pipeline protest grows violent 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Tear gas, concussion grenades, freezing cold water and rubber bullets were deployed against protesters last night and this morning -- not in some country across the seas but in Morton County, North Dakota. That's where hundreds of Native Americans and their supporters have vowed to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline from being tunneled under the Missouri River. Lynda Mapes, environment reporter for the Seattle Times, updates the tense stand-off between water protectors, oil industry developers and the courts.

Guests:
Lynda Mapes, Seattle Times (@LyndaVMapes)

The public interest and personal business at the Trump White House 32 MIN, 45 SEC

As a candidate, Donald Trump promised to "drain the swamp," but his own, global holdings already pose a unique set of ethical conflicts. The transition process has already provided unmistakable evidence of what might be to come. He's met with business partners from India who say his presidency will be a bonanza. Daughter Ivanka is marketing bracelets like the one she wore on 60 Minutes. She and other family members will be in charge of some 500 business investments all over the world. The Wall Street Journal says if Trump doesn't liqudate all those assets and create a blind trust, he'll never escape the appearance that his White House is up for sale.

Guests:
Eric Lipton, National reporter for the New York Times (@EricLiptonNYT)
Richard Painter, University of Minnesota (@RWPUSA)
Timothy Carney, Washington Examiner / American Enterprise Institute (@TPCarney)
David Eagles, Partnership for Public Service (@RPublicService)

More:
Lipton on Trump's far-flung holdings, potential for conflicts of interest
Painter on Trump's 'blind trust,' which is neither blind nor trustworthy
Carney on Trump setting his sights on the corrupting revolving door

Is viral fake news really a threat to democracy? 10 MIN, 12 SEC

It's hard enough to figure out what's true and what's not from the mainstream news media and the declarations of politicians. Now there's an uproar about "fake news," blamed for ethnic violence in Myanmar — and which might have influenced America's presidential election.


Image by C_osett

During the presidential campaign millions of online users circulated the story that Pope Francis had endorsed Donald Trump. At least one member of the US Senate tweeted that protesters against Donald Trump had been paid. Neither story was true. And they're classic examples of what mainstream news people call "fake news."

Guests:
Farhad Manjoo, New York Times (@fmanjoo)
Dan Gillmor, Arizona State University (@dangillmor)

More:
Manjoo on social media's globe-shaking power

Mediactive

Dan Gillmor

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