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FROM THIS EPISODE

Major decisions are expected this month from a US Supreme Court more divided politically than ever before. Also, insurgent fighters claim one of Iraq’s largest cities, and American casualties from friendly fire in Afghanistan.

Banner image by Steve Petteway, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States/The Oyez Project

Producers:
Caitlin Shamberg
Evan George
Mike Kessler

Insurgent Fighters Claim One of Iraq's Largest Cities 7 MIN, 49 SEC

Since the US withdrew from Iraq, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria has made mostly unchecked advances. Even al Qaeda has criticized it for "extreme methods." Today, it reportedly has seized control of part of Mosul, one of Iraq's major cities. Liz Sly is the Washington Post's bureau chief in Beirut, where she's coordinating coverage.

Guests:
Liz Sly, Washington Post (@lizsly)

The US Supreme Court: Politics or the Rule of Law? 34 MIN, 2 SEC

This month, the US Supreme Court is expected to decide cases on the limits of speech during abortion protests, organized labor and when police can search your cell phone. Those are cases with important potential consequences for many Americans. They'll be decided by a Court more divided than ever between Democrats and Republicans. Even Justice Stephen Breyer has worried aloud that he and his colleagues are now viewed as "junior varsity politicians." Rulings are supposed to be based on the Constitution and acts of Congress. They can affect the lives of many Americas now and for years to come. Is the Court led by Chief Justice John Roberts pursuing its own agenda? What would that mean for confidence in democracy and the rule of law?

Guests:
Neal Devins, College of William and Mary (@WMLawSchool)
Laurence Tribe, Harvard University (@Harvard_Law)
Randy Barnett, Georgetown Law School (@RandyEBarnett)

Uncertain Justice

Laurence Tribe

Despite the Drawdown, Friendly Fire Kills Five in Afghanistan 9 MIN, 42 SEC

In a remote corner of Afghanistan yesterday, US Special Forces and Afghan soldiers were ambushed by the Taliban. When they called for air support, six were killed by fire from a B-1 bomber. Special Forces are the last American soldiers in the field in Afghanistan, training Afghans during joint patrols in remote areas.  We get an update from Azam Ahmed, who is based in Kabul for the New York Times, and from Michael O'Hanlon of the Brookings Institution.

Guests:
Azam Ahmed, New York Times
Michael O'Hanlon, Brookings Institution (@MichaelEOHanlon)

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