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FROM THIS EPISODE

Once again today, America’s highest court failed to announce any plan to take up one or more cases involving the legalization of same-sex marriage. Now it’s expected to do so on Friday. Will the justices be paying attention to last month’s elections in 4 states? We’ll look at the high court’s options—and at the political ramifications, especially for the Republican Party. On Reporters Notebook later on, could deadly violence result from brain damage in professional football? Also in the news, Britain, France, Sweden, Denmark and Spain have summoned Israeli ambassadors to Israel to signal strong objection to Israel’s plans for expanding settlements in East Jerusalem.

Producers:
Evan George
Katie Cooper
Caitlin Shamberg

Making News Israeli Envoys Summoned in Protest of New Settlement Plans 12 MIN

Britain, France, Sweden, Denmark and Spain have summoned Israeli ambassadors to Israel to signal strong objection to Israel’s Plans for expanding settlements in East Jerusalem. Palestinian leaders have said they could mean the end of the so-called “2-state solution.”

Guests:
Laura Rozen, Al-Monitor (@lrozen)

Reporter's Notebook Kansas City Chief’s Jovan Belcher’s murder/suicide and the question of concussions in the NFL 18 MIN

This weekend’s case of murder and suicide raises familiar questions about brain damage and professional football. Jovan Belcher was an all-star linebacker for the Kansas City Chiefs, described by teammates, coaches, family and friends as “generous and caring.” This weekend he murdered his girlfriend, mother of his 3-month-old daughter, and then shot himself while talking with coaches at the team stadium. The incident is raising again some troubling questions. Almost 4,000 former players are suing the NFL over what the claim is a link between football and long-term brain damage. At Boston University, researchers are investigating possible connections.

Guests:
Steve Fainaru, Reporter for ESPN (@SteveFainaru)

Main Topic The US Supreme Court, Politics and Same Sex Marriage 30 MIN

US Supreme Court watchers are playing a waiting game in regard to same-sex marriage.  As the justices work out their differences behind closed doors, we’ll look at the options—and the potential consequences for the law and for politics.      

 

Polls show the trend in favor of same-sex marriage is growing fast.  For the first time in US history, it was approved by voters in three of last month’s elections, rather than in legislative chambers.  It’s now legal in nine states and the District of Columbia.  Friday—and again today—it was expected the US Supreme Court would take up the matter.  Both sides are waiting anxiously for action on Friday.  That provides more time to consider the options, legal, political and moral. 

Guests:
Douglas NeJaime, University of California, Irvine (@loyolalawblog)
Rick Jacobs, Courage Campaign (@rickjacobs)
John Eastman, National Organization for Marriage (@Chapman_Law)
Casey Pick, Programs Director for the Log Cabin Republicans

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