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FROM THIS EPISODE

The bailout of America's financial system began last fall, but the Bush Administration is history.  Now the Obama Administration is faced with growing outrage over the use of public money to rescue failed private companies. the Tata Nano will be the cheapest car in the world.But what about the environment and India’s traffic congestion?


Banner image: President Barack Obama listens as Treasury Secretary Geithner makes a point during a White House budget meeting. At left is Phil Schiliro, Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs. White House Photo: Pete Souza

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Sonya Geis
Christian Bordal

Making News Obama Administration's Bank Rescue Plan 6 MIN, 2 SEC

Last month, Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner's outline of plans to stabilize the banking system was panned as being short on substance. Today, when details were explained, stocks soared on Wall Street and markets around the world.  President Obama said the public-private partnership will allow banks to get bad assets off their books. Michael Crittenden is finance reporter for Dow Jones Newswires.

Guests:
Michael Crittenden, Reporter, Dow Jones Newswires

The Uprising

David Sirota

Reporter's Notebook The Tata Nano Has Arrived 7 MIN, 54 SEC

The Tata Nano has gone on sale in India for 100,000 rupees, just under $2000. Tata Motors hopes that means big sales for what's now the cheapest car in the world. Will millions of Indians give up their bikes and mopeds?  What about air pollution and traffic? Can you get one here? Dan Neil is the auto critic for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
Dan Neil, Wall Street Journal (@Danneilwsj)

Main Topic Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner and Bailout Backlash 34 MIN, 49 SEC

The Obama Administration today explained its public-private partnership to rescue the banking system, and stock prices shot up around the world.  But it may be too late to rescue Secretary Tim Geithner, who's taken the heat for AIG's executive bonuses and public payoffs to firms including Goldman Sachs. Some Republicans in Congress are calling for Geithner to be fired, and liberal commentators want him to go. The President says he wouldn't let him resign. Is there another way of heading off public outrage?

Guests:
David Sirota, Salon.com (@davidsirota)
Brad Sherman, US Congress (D-CA) (@BradSherman)
Steve Clemons, The Atlantic (@SCClemons)
David Rothkopf, The FP Group (@djrothkopf)

Superclass

David Rothkopf

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