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FROM THIS EPISODE

Today’s 72-hour ceasefire in Gaza lasted for about 90 minutes. As deadly fighting resumes, each side — as always — is blaming the other. Once again, professional journalists are caught in the middle, trying to report the claims of Israelis and Palestinians and assess their credibility. But here’s the problem: distrust and angry emotion extends to the news media. Accepted “facts” for part of the audience will be seen as “lies” by the other. Is there any chance of achieving “fairness” and “balance?”

Also, could the US tolerate not one, but six, Californias?

Banner Image: IDF soldiers operating in Gaza; Credit: Israel Defense Forces

Producers:
Mike Kessler
Jenny Hamel
Claire Martin

Gaza Ceasefire Breaks Down Hours After It Begins 6 MIN, 30 SEC

It took an hour and a half for a 72-hour ceasefire in Gaza to break down today. In the Southern City of Rafah, 2 Israeli soldiers were killed by a suicide bomber, and a third reportedly has been kidnapped. Since then, Israeli tank fire has killed at least 35 Palestinians. Nicholas Casey is in Gaza City for the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Nicholas Casey, Reporter, Wall Street Journal (@caseysjournal)

Truth, Lies and the Fighting in Gaza 35 MIN, 31 SEC

Today’s 72-hour ceasefire in Gaza lasted about 90 minutes, and the fighting has been resumed. Now, we’ll pull back and look at what it’s like to cover this ongoing story. It’s the ultimate challenge to the very concepts of “fairness” and “balance.” What one part of the audience sees as reporting the truth the other sees as propaganda. That’s a problem — not just for journalists in the field, but also for analysts of the media.

Guests:
Erik Wemple, Washington Post (@ErikWemple)
Mark Levine, UC Irvine
Gilead Ini, Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting (@GileadIni)
Emily Harris, NPR (@emilygharris)
Lina Attalah, Mada Masr (@linaattalah)

6 Californias Ballot Initiative 7 MIN, 59 SEC

California is vast, diverse, dynamic and influential. But Tim Draper thinks it has become too big to be manageable. He wants voters to divide all of California into six parts — new states with governors, members of Congress and US Senators. John Myers reports from Sacramento for KQED, public television and radio in San Frandcisco.

Guests:
John Myers, KQED (@johnmyers)

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