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FROM THIS EPISODE

The biggest primary day of the year has set the stage for the November elections. In the battle for control of Congress, Republicans have five times more money than Democrats.  So why are some conservatives saying the Republicans might as well lose?

Main Topic Tuesday's Primaries and a Look toward November 34 MIN, 50 SEC

In the biggest primary day of the year, nine states and the District of Columbia have chosen candidates for the November elections. Yesterday’s big political drama was Rhode Island's Republican Senate primary, where moderate incumbent Lincoln Chafee faced a tough challenge from conservative Mayor of Cranston, Steve Laffey.  The big question remains: are the Democrats or the Republicans now better positioned to control the House and the Senate? Were voters pro- or anti-incumbent? Are national or local issues most likely to prevail in November? Why are some conservatives saying the Republican Party will be better off if it looses?

Guests:
Jennifer Duffy, Cook Political Report (@jennifereduffy)
Bob Benenson, Editor, CQ Politics.com
Richard Viguerie, ConservativeHQ.com
John McLaughlin, Republican strategist, John McLaughlin and Associates
Bill Burton, Deputy Press Secretary, White House

Making News Iraqi PM al-Maliki Visits Fellow Shiite Leaders in Iran 6 MIN, 11 SEC

President Ahmadinejad of Iran has promised that his country will "establish complete security in Iraq." That came in response to a request from Iraqi Prime Minister al-Maliki in a visit to Tehran. But US officials have been saying that elements in Iran have stoked Iraq's sectarian violence. Edward Wong is in Baghdad for the New York Times.

Guests:
Edward Wong, Asia Correspondent, New York Times

Reporter's Notebook Gates, Rockefeller Foundations Join to Fight African Hunger 8 MIN

The Gates and Rockefeller Foundations have announced a joint project to create a new Green Revolution in sub-Saharan Africa, which, if current trends continue, will be the only region in the world where the number of poor people will be higher in 2015 than it was in 1990. The foundations hope to avoid the past pitfalls that caused environmental problems and favored large agricultural operations over small family farms.

Guests:
Pedro Sanchez, Director of the Tropical Agriculture Project, Columbia University

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