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FROM THIS EPISODE

The religious right is alive and well in America, but a "new generation" of evangelicals is also focused on poverty, the environment and many other issues. Is there a political shift among Christian conservatives? What could it mean for this year's presidential election? Also, US military prosecutors will seek the death penalty against six 9/11 detainees, and a review of this weekend's results and preview of tomorrow's "Potomac Primaries."


Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Karen Radziner
Sonya Geis

Main Topic A Political Transformation on the Religious Right? 36 MIN, 36 SEC

Evangelical Christians are broadening their horizons. In addition to abortion and same-sex marriage, they're now focused on poverty and the environment. Polls show large numbers of white evangelicals voting in Democratic primaries, while traditional church leaders are trying to keep them in the Republican fold. Is there a "great awakening" that could have an impact on this year's presidential election? We'll hear a dialogue between a "the new generation" of evangelicals and veterans of the religious right.

Guests:
Joel Hunter, Senior Pastor, Northland
Richard Land, Southern Baptist Convention (@erlcsbc)
Jim Wallis, Sojourners (@JimWallis)
Laura Olson, Professor of Political Science, Clemson University

Reporter's Notebook Potomac Primary Primer 6 MIN, 10 SEC

This year's tight contests for party nominations have focused attention on states that have never mattered much in presidential elections. Barack Obama swept to four victories in this weekend's primaries and caucuses. Mike Huckabee beat John McCain in Kansas and Louisiana and got close enough in Washington to challenge the outcome.  In tomorrow's so-called "Potomac Primaries" in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia, the focus is mostly on the Democrats.  Anne Kornblut reports for the Washington Post.

Guests:
Anne Kornblut, White House Correspondent, Washington Post

Making News September 11 Suspects Face Murder Charges 6 MIN, 12 SEC

Six and a half years after September 11, the Pentagon today released the charges it plans to file against Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and five other Guantánamo detainees. Military prosecutors will seek the death penalty against all six. Air Force Brigadier General Thomas Hartman says they'll get the same legal rights as American soldiers accused of crimes and are innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Josh Meyer reports on terrorism for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
Josh Meyer, Northwestern University (@JoshMeyerDC)

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