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FROM THIS EPISODE

President Bush has yet to announce his new strategy for Iraq, but Democrats already are lining up to oppose it. What power do they have to change the way the war is conducted? Will the Iraqi government agree to "benchmarks" if President Bush demands them? Plus, President Bush names a new ambassador to the UN, and Mexico's latest war on drugs involves disarming local police. Can federal troops overcome municipal corruption?

Producers:
Vanessa Romo
Dan Konecky
Karen Radziner

Main Topic What's Next in Iraq and on Capitol Hill?

Official Washington--and much of the world--are waiting for Wednesday's televised announcement of the President's "new strategy" for the war in Iraq. Most reports say it will mean an increase in troop strength of 20,000 or more, which Democrats now call an "escalation," in reference to Vietnam. The latest reports also say that the President will ask the Iraqi government to meet certain "benchmarks."  The new leaders say voters rejected the war, but what power does Congress have to change the way it's conducted?  Does the Iraqi government have the will or the capacity to meet "benchmarks" that may be demanded by President Bush?

Guests:
Warren Strobel, Senior Foreign Affairs Correspondent, McClatchy Newspapers
Laith Kubba, Spokesman, former Iraqi Prime Minister al-Jaafari
Jonathan Weisman, New York Times (@jonathanweisman)
Henry Waxman, US Congress (D-CA) (@WaxmanClimate)

Reporter's Notebook Mexico's President Disarms Police, Launches New War on Drugs

Mexico's new President Felipe Calderón has declared war on the drug traffic that's corrupted local police and led to hundreds of murders in the past year. Last week, Calderon disarmed police in crime-plagued Tijuana and other cities and replaced them with thousands of federal troops. On Saturday, 2300 local police were ordered back to their jobs after being relieved of their weapons.

Guests:
Sandra Dibble, Reporter for the San Diego Union-Tribune

Making News Bush Taps US Ambassador to Iraq Khalilzad for UN Post

The current US Ambassador to Iraq has been named the next US Ambassador to the United Nations.  The President wants Zalmay Khalilzad, a Sunni Muslim born in Afghanistan, to succeed John Bolton, who could not get enough Senate votes for confirmation.  Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice made the announcement.

Guests:
Carol Giacomo, Diplomatic correspondent for Reuters

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