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FROM THIS EPISODE

Wins in both Indiana and North Carolina tomorrow could wrap things up for Barack Obama, but Hillary Clinton's doing well enough to make both states unpredictable. We look at the impact of Reverend Wright, the "gas tax holiday" and other issues. Also, tens of thousands killed when Myanmar is hit by a deadly cyclone, and another high-profile racehorse had to be put down Saturday after the Kentucky Derby, leading to demands for change in selective breeding.

Producers:
Dan Konecky
Katie Cooper
Sonya Geis

Making News Cyclone Death Toll in Myanmar Could Rise 5 MIN, 53 SEC

Myanmar, the country once known as Burma, has been struck by a cyclone with winds exceeding 120 miles an hour. The death toll may rise above 10,000. Pam Sitko, emergency communications officer for World Vision's Asia Region, has an update.

Guests:
Pam Sitko, Emergency Communications Officer, World Vision's Asia Region

Main Topic Tar Heels and Hoosiers Head to the Polls 35 MIN, 53 SEC

Over the weekend, Barack Obama won Guam's Democratic delegates by seven points, but it's been weeks since he posted a big victory. He once called Indiana primary the "tie breaker" with Hillary Clinton. His big lead in North Carolina made it a "fire-wall," like Ohio was for her. If Obama won both, it could be the end of the Clinton campaign, but now it appears both states are closer than anybody expected. Indiana and North Carolina are complicated in different ways. Do they want to hear about "change" or "bread and butter" economics? Does a "gas tax holiday" sound like a good deal or cynical promise? 

Guests:
Walter Shapiro, Yahoo News and Columbia Journalism Review (@waltershapiroPD)
Frank Newport, Gallup Poll (@gallup)
Robert Dion, Professor of Political Science, Evansville University
Kerry Haynie, Professor of Political Science, Duke University
Joel Kotkin, Chapman University

Polling Matters

Frank Newport

Reporter's Notebook The Predictable Demise of Eight Belles 6 MIN, 51 SEC

Two years ago it was Barbaro after the Preakness.  Saturday, it was Eight Belles, after a heroic second-place finish in the Kentucky Derby.  Racehorses of extraordinary promise, which had to be put down just as their careers were getting underway. Twenty of Saturday's Kentucky-Derby entrants were descended from one horse, Native Dancer.  Ankles are the tragic flaw of that extended family. Jon Weinbach is sports-business reporter for the Wall Street Journal.

Guests:
Jon Weinbach, sportswriter and filmmaker

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