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FROM THIS EPISODE

More than seven million Americans have health insurance because of Obamacare.  Another chance to enroll starts tomorrow.  But another round of attacks on the Affordable Care Act is already well underway.  We hear about new requirements and about political and legal challenges.

Also, America’s neglected nuclear arms. On today’s Talking Point, Illinois banned the death penalty after Northwestern University’s “Innocence Project” got a condemned man released when another man confessed to the murder.  Now it turns out that confession was falsely obtained.

Photo: Helge V. Keltel

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Claire Martin

Neglected Nuclear Arms 6 MIN, 30 SEC

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says billions of dollars are needed for emergency fixes to nuclear weapons in silos, submarines and storage facilities. At a Pentagon briefing today, Hagel acknowledged, “The reviews found evidence of systematic problems, if not addressed could undermine the safety, security and effectiveness of the elements of the forces in the future. These problems include manning, infrastructure and skill deficiencies.  Today’s New York Times calls the Pentagon review a “searing indictment” of how America’s nuclear arsenal has been allowed to decay since the end of the Cold War. David Sanger co-authored the story.

 

Thanks to Sasa Woodruff for production assistance.

Guests:
David Sanger, New York Times (@SangerNYT)

Year Two for Obamacare: Is There Trouble Ahead? 34 MIN, 20 SEC

With seven million people already signed up for health insurance, enrollment under Obamacare opens again tomorrow.  Americans without health insurance will get a new chance to enroll, while some who enrolled last year may want to renew.  But opponents have unearthed taped statements by an Administration advisor suggesting lies were used to get the law passed, and the US Supreme Court has agreed to decide if “four little words” were merely a typo or evidence that could cancel health insurance subsidies in 36 states.  We hear about efforts to recruit Latinos, young people and others who didn’t sign up last year as the political and legal pounding continues. 

More:
MIT Professor Jonathan Gruber on Obamacare (video)

Sick

Jonathan Cohn

Medill Innocence Project Involved in a Wrongful Conviction 9 MIN, 7 SEC

In 1999 the Medill Innocence Project took up the case of Anthony Porter, who had been sentenced to death in the killings of two people at a Chicago swimming pool. Porter was released when the Medill Innocence Project came up with a confession by Alstory Simon, who then spent 15 years in prison. Now it turns out that confession was falsely obtained, and he, too, has been released.  Eric Zorn is a columnist for the Chicago Tribune.

Guests:
Eric Zorn, Chicago Tribune (@EricZorn)

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