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FROM THIS EPISODE

Los Angeles will be one of the first five of President Obama's Promise Zones, which make up his key anti-poverty program. It could get $500 million over the next 10 years.  But why are Koreatown, Hollywood and Los Feliz included — and not Watts or other neighborhoods South of the 10 Freeway? What standards were used to determine need? Is politics part of the answer? Also, LA has Chinatown, Thai Town and Little Tokyo. Now there's a move to designate neighborhoods for Latinos. We already have the 'El Salvador Corridor.' Is it time for 'Peru Village' and 'Little Venezuela?'

Image-for-WWLA.jpgLater, on To the Point, last month, for the first time since 2003, US casualties from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan dropped to zero. But American soldiers have been dying at the rate of 22 every day — from suicide. What's the Pentagon doing to cope with mental illness — after combat and before enlistment?

 

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Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Katie Cooper
Mike Kessler
Saul Gonzalez

The Push for Distinct Latino Neighborhoods 11 MIN, 21 SEC

Asians from different countries are recognized in Los Angeles neighborhoods with official designations, including Koreatown, Little Tokyo and Thai Town. But the many national groups from South of the Border have been lumped together as "Latinos," rather than being officially singled out. Now, there's an El Salvador Corridor; Peru Village may be next.

 

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Guests:
Saul Gonzalez, KCRW producer (@SaulKCRW)
Cristina Mora, UC Berkeley (@GCristinaMora)

More:
Los Angeles Times on advocates seeking to carve out official Latin American areas in LA
Mora's 'Making Hispanics: How Activists, Bureaucrats, and Media Constructed a New American'

Making Hispanics

G. Cristina Mora

Are LA's Poorest Left Out of the President's 'Promise Zone?' 15 MIN, 41 SEC

The Obama White House has chosen Los Angeles to be one of the first five Promise Zones across the country, a designation that could mean $500 million over the next ten years. Mayor Garcetti says he's delighted, but other local leaders are disappointed. Pico-Union, Westlake and East Hollywood are part of the Zone — but so are parts of Koreatown, Hollywood and Los Feliz. Political leaders and others South of the 10 Freeway are asking if Watts and other neighborhoods don't have much greater need. What are the goals of the Promise Zone, and the standards for choosing one part of town over another?

More:
LA Times on anti-poverty zone leaving out LA's poorest

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