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FROM THIS EPISODE

LA's growing homeless population makes feeding people who live on the streets more urgent than ever. But that's led to a backlash in some neighborhoods that lack public toilets and other supportive services. Now there's a move in the City Council to restrict feeding in public places, as other American cities have done. Is that humane? Is it legal? We hear the pros and cons. Also, Westwood, once the hippest scene in Los Angeles, has been on the decline for decades. Saul Gonzalez tells us how the Hammer Museum has tried to bring energy back to the neighborhood.

Image-for-WWLA.jpgOn our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, everybody concerned with the Internet, from broadband services to content providers to online users, has a stake in a federal court case that will soon be decided. We hear what's in store for "net neutrality" and what it could mean for you.

 
 

Banner image: SamPac

Producers:
Jenny Hamel
Christian Bordal
Gideon Brower

Reporter's Notebook The Decline of Westwood Village

Westwood Village, between UCLA and Wilshire Boulevard, was a lively neighborhood of crowded bars and restaurants with long lines at movie theaters showing the latest releases. We hear from KCRW's Saul Gonzalez, who compares what it was then to what it is now, and from Adrian Glick Kudler, editor of the website Curbed LA.

Saul spoke with Steve Sann (Westwood Community Council), Andrew Thomas (Westwood Village Improvement Association), Ann Philbin (Hammer Museum) and (Westwood resident) Patti Seidenbaum.

 

ww131126westwood-SaulGonzalez.jpg

 

For more pictures of Westwood, then and now, check out our Which Way, LA? blog at kcrw.com/whichwaylablog

Guests:
Adrian Glick Kudler, Curbed LA (@curbedLA)

Main Topic Does LA Need New Rules for Feeding the Homeless?

Homelessness is on the decline in America — but not in LA, where it's increased by 27% over last year. Local groups have been feeding the homeless in public places, including skid row. There and in other neighborhoods, residents have complained. Now, City Council members Tom LaBonge and Mitch O'Farrell are proposing a requirement to move food lines indoors. 

Guests:
Ted Landreth, Greater West Hollywood Food Coalition
Peter Nichols, Melrose Action Neighborhood Watch (@melroseaction)

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