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FROM THIS EPISODE

A few Republicans want to make a deal with Governor Brown on his budget proposal, including a vote of the people on extending taxes. Will changes in environmental laws they're demanding be too much for the Democrats? State budget cuts threaten teachers with layoffs from LA Unified. We hear about pink slips and surprise decisions on who gets to run charter schools. Also, the run on potassium-iodide pills for radiation protection. On our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, is the war in Afghanistan being forgotten?

Producers:
Frances Anderton
Christian Bordal
Jacob Conrad
Darrell Satzman

Main Topic GOP Tries to Trade Environmental Regulations for Tax-Cut Vote 11 MIN, 1 SEC

The latest Field Poll says 58 percent of California voters approved Governor Brown's plan for closing the $26 billion state budget gap. He wants half made up with spending cuts and half by extending expired taxes on income, sales and vehicles — but only if voters approve in a special election. Democrats have enough votes to give him the cuts, but Republicans are required to put the tax extensions on the ballot in June. The GOP's official position is "No."  But today's Los Angeles Times reports that five Republicans are negotiating with the Governor, asking him for some major concessions.

Guests:
Eric Hogue, KTKZ-AM
Darry Sragow, Democratic political consultant

Reporter's Notebook LAUSD Teachers Get Pink Slips 7 MIN, 19 SEC

One of the questions that won't be decided until there's a budget is how many LA teachers are going to be laid off. If voters don't approve the tax extensions Governor Brown has asked for, school districts will face another round of layoffs. Yesterday, the last of 7300 pink slips went to teachers in the LA Unified School District.  Howard Blume covers education for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times (@howardblume )

Main Topic Afghanistan: Is America's Longest War Being Forgotten? 26 MIN, 58 SEC

Is the US on a Path to Victory in Afghanistan?President Obama's commander in Afghanistan, General David Petraeus, is in Washington this week, making his first official, public reports since he was appointed last June. He talked to a Senate committee yesterday and to a House counterpart today. But at a crucial moment for the war in Afghanistan, Petraeus is not getting much attention about what he calls "progress" that is "fragile and reversible." With public opinion turning against the war, what's next for 98,000 American soldiers?

Guests:
Gary Langer, ABC News (@LangerResearch)
Yochi Dreazen, Foreign Policy magazine (@yochidreazen)
Alissa Johannsen Rubin, New York Times (@alissanyt)
David Barno, Center for a New American Security
Leslie Gelb, Council on Foreign Relations (@CFR_org)

Making News Run on Potassium Iodide: Do Californians Need It? 8 MIN, 4 SEC

Since word of the Japanese nuclear crisis broke Friday night, pharmacies have been besieged by customers worried about exposure to radiation that can cause thyroid cancer. While manufacturers are sending as many potassium-iodide pills as possible to Japan, US Surgeon General Regina Benjamin dismissed the need here, at least for right now. Kathryn Higley, who spent 14 years at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, is Professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering at Oregon State University.

Guests:
Kathryn Higley, Oregon State University

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