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FROM THIS EPISODE

Magic Johnson and his wealthier partners paid a huge price for the Dodgers. Are they also playing ball with the National Football League? All that space around Dodger stadium could be a challenge to plans by AEG, Mayor Villaraigosa and the LA City Council for development of Farmers' Field and part of the convention center. We hear what LA's learning about the business of big time sports. Also, promoters now claim California's rapid rail system won't be a "train to nowhere" after all. Will it ever get up to speed? On our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, will big data and big money mean big trouble?

Banner image: (L-R) Dodger Stadium by Jake N., Staples Center by Rina Laxa

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Frances Anderton
Gideon Brower

Main Topic Are the NFL and MLB Putting the Squeeze on LA City Hall? 15 MIN, 57 SEC

Mayor Villaraigosa and members of the Los Angeles City Council have been jumping through hoops to get the National Football League to field a team in downtown Los Angeles. They've made concessions to Phil Anschutz of AEG, the developer of Staples Center and LA Live.  But Anschutz himself is driving a hard bargain with the NFL, and the much-ballyhooed $2.15 billion deal for the Dodgers — more than anybody has ever paid for a sports franchise -- could complicate matters still further.

Guests:
Dakota Smith, Daily News (@dakotacdsmith)
Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times (@latimesfarmer)
D.J. Waldie, KCET

Main Topic Will Big Data and Big Money Mean Big Trouble? 26 MIN, 41 SEC

Will Big Data and Big Money Mean Big Trouble?The so-called "Year of Big Data" has produced uses and potential abuses of gathering more information than anyone ever imagined before. What is this a vast, new industry? What are the benefits and the dangers, especially to consumers who use the Internet?

Guests:
Gilad Elbaz, Factual (@gilelbaz)
Steve Lohr, New York Times (@stevelohr )
Marc Rotenberg, Electronic Privacy Information Center

Privacy, Information, and Technology (Aspen Elective)

Marc Rotenberg, Daniel J. Solove, Paul M. Schwartz

Making News Faster, Cheaper Plan for High-Speed Rail 8 MIN, 28 SEC

Relying on federal money, the initial leg of California's high-speed rail was planned from Chowchilla to Corcoran in the San Joaquin Valley. But with Republicans in Washington now opposed to the whole idea, California is now planning a different route with a different source of funding. Tim Sheehan reports for the Fresno Bee.

Guests:
Tim Sheehan, Fresno Bee (@tsheehan)

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