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FROM THIS EPISODE

More and more consumers want entertainment over the Internet, and Silicon Valley's tech companies are happy to oblige. But it's Hollywood that produces quality content. Can they co-exist or are they on a collision course?

Also, Paramount has now cancelled showings of a film lampooning a North Korean dictator. We hear more about the ripple-affect of the cyber attack on Sony, and talk with the longest-serving wrongfully incarcerated prisoner in California history.

Photos: Composite of Hollywood (Pixabay) and YouTube (Rego Korosi)

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Sasa Woodruff
Katie Cooper

How Filmmakers View Sony's Decision to Pull "The Interview" 6 MIN, 58 SEC

The government now says it's "99% certain" that the vast and sophisticated cyber attack against Sony Pictures was the work of North Korea.  A subsequent threat to movie theaters led Sony to cancel tonight's premiere and the Christmas Day general release of The Interview.  That's the dark comedy about the assassination of North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Un.  Now Paramount has cancelled scheduled screenings of Team America: World Police, which lampoons a North Korean dictator -- even though it's been playing since 2004.  The question we pose to filmmaker Adam McKay is, "what's next?"

Guests:
Adam McKay, filmmaker (@GhostPanther)

Why Can't Hollywood and Silicon Valley Just Get Along? 14 MIN, 28 SEC

More and more consumers are going to the Internet for entertainment, turning away from movie theaters and TV.  Hollywood is losing control of its distribution model.  Silicon Valley distributors are trying to produce content, but they can't match the quality that comes out of Hollywood.  Can they learn to live with each other? 

Guests:
Tom Dotan, The Information (@cityofthetown)
Erin McPherson, Maker Studios (@MakerStudios)
Patrick Roberts, UltraMedia Innovation

More:
Dotan's series on the tensions between Silicon Valley and Hollywood
Roberts' comparison of Hollywood and Silicon Valley cultures

Exonerated, 36 Years Later 5 MIN, 50 SEC

Michael Hanline is the longest-serving prisoner in California history to be wrongfully incarcerated: 36 years for a murder he says he didn't commit. Late last month, the California Innocence Project helped him to be set free. KCRW's Jenny Hamel caught up with Hanline to talk about his ordeal and what's happening to others still in prison and seeking clemency.

For an extended interview with Michael Hanline, and images from the vigil, visit our WWLA blog.

More:
WWLA discussion about injustice in the justice system

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