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LA County's Museum of Art celebrated its 50th year on Saturday night.  The gala revealed $675 million worth of new art and a crowd that included Hollywood celebrities — a far cry from the establishment types that inaugurated the institution five decades ago.  We talk with Director Michael Govan about changes he's made and his vision of LACMA's future, including a controversial new building -- no longer being called, "The Blob."

Also, a precious heritage won't be sold to the highest bidder: arts and craft made in Japanese-American internment camps during World War II.

Photo: Model of Peter Zumthor's proposed new building for LACMA

Producers:
Jenny Hamel
Evan George

Fifty Years of LACMA 17 MIN, 9 SEC

When Michael Govan took over LA County's Museum of Art in 2006, it was a bastion of old money. This past Saturday night, the 50th birthday gala demonstrated how much he has made it the darling of the entertainment industry. Nobody disputes LACMA's renaissance over the past 10 years. Mayor Garcetti calls it proof that this is "LA's second golden age." But Peter Zumthor's building does have some people grumbling. To make way for the Zumthor Building, three buildings designed by William Pereira are scheduled to come down.

See more models and details of Zumthor's proposed new building for LACMA

Guests:
Michael Govan, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (@LACMA)
Frances Anderton, Host, 'DnA: Design & Architecture' (@FrancesAnderton)
Alan Hess, architect and historian (@shotlivephoto)

More:
Joseph Giovannini on Zumthor's building
'Press Play' on LACMA's humble beginnings

Japanese Internment Art Will Not Be Sold to the Highest Bidder 7 MIN, 36 SEC

It took the threat of a legal injunction, but a rare collection of arts and crafts from Japanese-American internment camps will not be auctioned off after all. After Pearl Harbor, 120,000 Japanese-Americans — two thirds of whom were citizens — were held in 10 so-called "relocation camps" until the end of World War II. During internment, they produced a variety of objects, 450 of which were collected but never exhibited. We hear about them from Greg Kimura, president and CEO of the Japanese-American National Museum here in Los Angeles.

Guests:
Greg Kimura, Japanese American National Museum (@gwkimura)

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