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FROM THIS EPISODE

Governor Brown took it on the chin last night when some fellow Democrats failed to support his initiative to cut gasoline consumption by 50%. It's still not clear if he'll get the money to fix the state's dilapidated roads and freeways. With this year's legislative session ending tomorrow, we update the so-called "right to die" measure and look ahead to next year — when both the Assembly and Senate will be led by Latinos for the first time.

Also, Orange County gets ready for Syrian refugees.  

Photo: President pro tem Kevin de León addresses the California Senate

Producers:
Sarah Sweeney
Paul von Zielbauer

In Sacramento, Saving the Biggest for Last 16 MIN, 14 SEC

With the state legislature's current session is scheduled to end tomorrow, it's time to invoke a long-standing maxim: "the hardest, most controversial proposals are almost always left until the very end." That's according to John Myers, who reports from Sacramento for KQED, public radio and television in San Francisco.

Guests:
John Myers, Los Angeles Times (@johnmyers)
Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, USC Price School of Public Policy (@sbjusc)
Ofelia Medina, North Association of Latino Elected Officials (@NALEO)

More:
WWLA on SB 350, clean air legislation

California Agencies Brace for Syrian Refugees 7 MIN, 10 SEC

The White House said today the US will accept "at least" 10,000 people from war zones in the Middle East. Secretary of State John Kerry reportedly told congressional leaders in a closed session that 100,000 may be coming. One place that's likely to see an influx is Orange County. Nahla Kayali is founder and executive director of Access California Services, which serves Arab and Muslim refugees and immigrants.

Guests:
Nahla Kayali, Access California Services (@AccessCal)

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