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FROM THIS EPISODE

Initial enrollment numbers for the Affordable Care Act were made public today, and California leads the nation with 35,000. But that’s hardly a victory for Obamacare. In all 36 states where the federal government is in charge, the total was 27,000 — and the nationwide number is 10% of what had been hoped for. We hear what that could mean for affordable health insurance. Also, gracious homes with lawns and gardens look on the outside like those next door in Thousand Oaks. But as many as 40 immigrant workers live on the inside. We visit a subdivision of gardeners, housekeepers and baby sitters in Newbury Park. 

Image-for-WWLA.jpgOn our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, at the cost of $100 billion taxpayer dollars a year, the Farm Bill pays for controversial policies, including food stamps and subsidies to big agribusiness. Now it's expired, and compromise is stalled by partisanship. We hear about Republican and Democratic versions and what might happen if no bill passes at all.

Producers:
Evan George
Sonya Geis
Christian Bordal

Main Topic Obamacare Numbers Look Best in California 11 MIN, 7 SEC

At a news conference today, Peter Lee announced that 70% of the Californians enrolled in the Affordable Care Act so far found the process was easy. Lee, who's Executive Director of Covered California, said "I really hope this puts to bed the drumbeat of comments about glitches and computer problems. Californians, at CoveredCA.com, enrolling with ease." Lee also announced that 35,000 Californians have enrolled — double the number in any other state and more than the total of 36 states where the federal government is in charge with healthcare.gov.

Guests:
Dan Weintraub, California Health Report (@HealthyCal)
Anthony Wright, Health Access California (@healthaccess)

Reporter's Notebook Immigrants Living behind the Facade of SoCal Suburbia 9 MIN, 25 SEC

Wealthy suburbs in Southern California aren't thought of as home to recent immigrants from south of the border. Many people who work in Thousand Oaks, for example, can't afford single family houses there and zoning laws prevent high-density living. Next door in Newbury Park, it's a different story, even though it looks just the same. KCRW Producer Anayansi Diaz-Cortez has the story of Las Casitas.

You can read more much about Las Casitas, see photos and a floor plan at kcrw/sonictrace

Guests:
Anayansi Diaz-Cortes, Independent Producer, Creator of KCRW’s Sonic Trace (@anayansi_dc)

Making News LA Unions and the Supreme Court 5 MIN, 9 SEC

Labor unions have used so-called "neutrality agreements" to organize workers in LA and other parts of California. Unite Here struck such a deal with Hyatt Hotels this summer in Los Angeles and other cities. Today, the US Supreme Court heard arguments that "neutrality agreements" violate federal law because they are "things of value." History Professor Nelson Lichtenstein is director of the Center for the Study of Work, Labor and Democracy at UC Santa Barbara.

Guests:
Nelson Lichtenstein, University of California, Santa Barbara

The Retail Revolution

Nelson Lichtenstein

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