ON AIR STAR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

Last year, police killings of two Latino men in Anaheim sparked days of rock-throwing met by non-lethal projectiles near City Hall. This year, community outrage is focused on politics and an electoral system Latinos say is stacked against them. Is a system of at-large elections keeping 53% of the population off the City Council? We hear what the all-white Council proposes and about a legal challenge with a hearing tomorrow. Also, 34 Chinese 10th grade students on the plane that crashed Saturday in San Francisco — including the two who were killed — were headed for a Christian school in the West Valley. We hear what a US education can mean for middle-class Chinese kids.

Image-for-WWLA.jpgOn our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, with total control in North Carolina, Republicans are enacting an ultra-conservative agenda, sparking the largest and most sustained protest movement seen in the South in years. Is the GOP fighting a losing battle or is the South as solid as ever?

Banner image: (L-R) Anaheim City Council Member Gail Eastman, Mayor Tom Tait, Council Members Lucille Kring, Jordan Brandman and Kris Murray. Photo: © Jordan Murph

Producers:
Evan George
Sonya Geis
Katie Cooper

Main Topic Race and Political Representation in Anaheim 16 MIN, 21 SEC

Fifty-three percent of the people in Anaheim are Latinos, but there's none on the City Council. That was the subject of a class-action lawsuit even before last year's days of rage over the police killing of two Latino men.

Guests:
Jose Moreno, California State University, Long Beach
Kris Murray, Anaheim City Council
Justin Levitt, Loyola Law School (@_justinlevitt_)

Reporter's Notebook Girls Killed in Asiana Plane Crash Were Headed for LA Summer Camp 8 MIN, 19 SEC

The two Chinese girls killed in Saturday's plane crash in San Francisco were among 34 bound for the West Valley Christian School and summer camp in Los Angeles. The West Valley Christian School is hardly the only American destination for young Chinese. Education in the United States has become an important asset for people in China's rising middle class.

Guests:
Thomas Hollihan, University of Southern California

Upcoming

View Schedule

New Episodes

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK EMAIL
TWITTER COPY LINK
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED