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FROM THIS EPISODE

Vice President Cheney says he and other top Bush Administration officials approved "abusive" interrogation techniques.  A bipartisan Senate committee calls it illegal.  Will Barack Obama investigate or leave the recent past to future historians?  We hear a debate.  Also, a new superintendent for LA schools, and more slings and arrows over the state budget in Sacramento.

Producers:
Gary Scott
Katie Cooper
Karen Radziner

Main Topic Presidential Transition and Accountability 25 MIN, 21 SEC

The Senate Armed Services Committee report says "abusive" interrogation techniques were not the work of a few low-level "bad apples" at Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo Bay. Top Administration officials, including Donald Rumsfeld, Air Force General Richard Myers and Condoleezza Rice, signed off on water-boarding and other practices some call torture.  All committee members from both parties agreed that was wrong. Vice President Cheney says he personally approved those practices, and calls them effective — and legal.

Guests:
Roy Gutman, Foreign Editor, McClatchy Newspapers
Caroline Frederickson, Director of the Washington Legislative Office, ACLU
Scott Horton, Professor, Columbia Law School
Bruce Fein, attorney

Making News Ramon Cortines Named Superintendent of LA Schools 9 MIN, 44 SEC

Former admiral David Brewer is now the former Superintendent of Los Angeles Schools.  Last week, Brewer said he'd step down before the end of the year.  Today, the elected School Board picked his top deputy to replace him. Ramon Cortines will take a position he once held on a temporary basis.  We get an update on today's decision from LAUSD Board President Monica Garcia.

Guests:
Monica Garcia, President of the Board of Education, Los Angeles Unified School District

Main Topic Republicans Bring a Hatchet to the Budget Debate 16 MIN, 57 SEC

With the shortfall between spending and income growing day by day, Republicans yesterday offered their ideas for a balanced budget: $15.6 billion in cuts -- more than $10 billion from education -- and $6.5 billion in so-called "new" money. Governor Schwarzenegger and the Democrats scoffed at the plan, but conceded it was better than no plan at all.  We get three perspectives.

Guests:
Anthony York, Grizzly Bear Project (@anthonyyork49)
Steve Baric, Secretary, California Republican Party
Roger Salazar, Spokesman, California Democratic Party

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