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FROM THIS EPISODE

Calls for water conservation are being taken seriously in most of the state, but Southern Californians can’t see the drought through the fountain spray and the over-watered foliage. Good water management has produced a false sense of security, which is about to dry up along with the water supply. Voluntary measures are not doing the job, so fines of $500 will be imposed on “wasteful practices.” What are they? Will local agencies have to rely on neighbors to enforce the ban?

Also, a federal judge in Santa Ana rules that California’s death penalty is cruel and unusual punishment.

Banner Image: The view from Marine One en route to Firebaugh, Calif., February 14, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Producers:
Katie Cooper
Evan George

Federal Judge Strikes Down CA’s Death Penalty 6 MIN, 48 SEC

Federal Judge Cormac Carney ruled today that “systematic delay” in administering California’s death penalty has made it unconstitutional. He vacated the death sentence of murder convict Ernest Dewayne Jones.

Guests:
Gil Garcetti, former District Attorney of Los Angeles County

Southern California Struggles to Stave Off Drought 17 MIN, 13 SEC

Instead of reducing water use by 20% as Governor Brown has called for, California has increased it by one percent. In the Southland, it’s up by 8%. The State Water Quality Control Board is cracking down by establishing fines for wasteful practices, and LA’s Department of Water and Power says it’s going to beef up enforcement of rules that are even tougher.

Guests:
Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times (@boxall)
Jay Famiglietti, UC Irvine (@JayFamiglietti)
Penny Falcon, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (@LADWP)

More:
Op-Ed: How much water does California have left?

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