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The Salton Sea in Imperial County is bigger than Lake Tahoe. Created by accident 110 years ago, it became a habitat for fish, migratory birds—and Hollywood celebrities. But now it's become a dustbowl of toxic chemicals. Will the State make good on a promise to save it?

Also on the program, Governor Brown has signed the so-called "End of Life" bill, making assisted suicide legal in California.

Photo: m01229

Producers:
Paul von Zielbauer
Sarah Sweeney

Governor Brown's Busy Weekend of Bill Signing 7 MIN, 6 SEC

This afternoon, Governor Brown signed one of the most controversial measures in this year's legislative session. It's called "The End of Life" bill. David Siders, who covers the Capitol for the Sacramento Bee, has details on the legislation.

Guests:
David Siders, Sacramento Bee (@davidsiders)

More:
Governor Brown on signing the End of Life bill

California's Biggest Lake, More Toxic than Ever 17 MIN, 21 SEC

In 1905, levees broke on the Colorado River, and the water flowed into the lowest point in the United States to become the Salton Sea. California's largest inland body of water has become a magnet for fish, migratory birds and tourists, but it's also a receptacle for agricultural water runoff. Now, the drought is making it smaller, leaving behind a dust-bowl of toxic chemicals. We hear more about this potential disaster and plans to avert it.

Guests:
Felicia Marcus, State Water Resources Control Board (@CaWaterBoards)
Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times (@LATsandiego)
Bruce Wilcox, California Natural Resources Agency

More:
Little Hoover Commission's call for action to avert disaster and save the Salton Sea
Salton Sea Restoration Project
LA Times editorial on the urgency to save the Salton Sea

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