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FROM THIS EPISODE

Two of USC's 2500 students from China were murdered yesterday morning a mile from the campus. Is violent crime on the rise again in West Adams? Why have Chinese social media sensationalized the incident with reports of "rich kids" in a BMW. Also, "So nice you'll see it twice." That's one headline about this year's Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival, which will be held on two 3-day weekends instead of just one. After all, it only holds 75,000 people.  But can all those rock, hip-hop and electronica artists deliver a second command performance? On our rebroadcast of To the Point, Iran comes back to the bargaining table.

Banner image: A sign asking for privacy is posted on the door of a house where a Ming Qu ran for help after an overnight shooting in Los Angeles on April 11, 2012 in California. Photo by Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Producers:
Christian Bordal
Caitlin Shamberg
Anna Scott

Main Topic Study and Safety at USC 13 MIN, 26 SEC

Early yesterday morning, after a typical evening of library study, Ying Wu drove Ming Qu to her apartment in the West Adams District a mile from campus. While they were chatting in his double-parked BMW, both were shot. She died in the passenger seat, he on the steps of a building he tried to enter in search of help. The LAPD is searching for a lone attacker, who might have been photographed by surveillance cameras.

Guests:
Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times (@‏anblanx)
Shako Liu, USC's Neon Tommy (@shako_liu)

Reporter's Notebook Coachella 12 MIN, 29 SEC

Last year, all 75,000 three-day passes for the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival sold out in less than a week. Instead of doubling the capacity of the venue — with all that would mean for traffic and over-crowding in Indio, festival co-founder Paul Tollett decided to hold two festivals on successive weekends.

Guests:
Glenn Miller, City of Indio
Erik Massie, CoachellaRecordings.com
Ben Harper, Musician (@BENHARPER)

Main Topic Iran Comes Back to the Bargaining Table on Nuclear Program 27 MIN, 13 SEC

During massive protest over alleged fraud in President Ahmadinejad's re-election, Iran ended international nuclear talks in 2009. Now, Iran's nuclear development program is back on the bargaining table -- or is it? Talks are scheduled to start on Saturday, but there's real doubt they'll last much longer than that. With new elections looming in both Iran and the United States, what are the prospects for anything more?

Guests:
Robin Wright, US Institute of Peace (@wrightr)
Hooman Majd, journalist and author (@hmajd)
Melody Moezzi, author, activist and attorney (@melodymoezzi)
Patrick Clawson, Washington Institute for Near East Policy

Eternal Iran

Patrick Clawson

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