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FROM THIS EPISODE

When the Watts Riots broke out 50 years ago, the neighborhood was a black ghetto. There was too much poverty, too little education and pervasive police brutality. The Riots are also called the Rebellion. We talk with two people who were on the scene. Now, Watts is predominantly Latino. We'll hear what else has changed…and what remains the same. 

Also, the new film, Straight Outta Compton premiers on Friday, recalling the days of the gansta rap group NWA and how they staged a different kind of rebellion.

Photo: Jengod

Producers:
Benjamin Gottlieb
Charlotte Duren

Riots, Rebellion and Rethinking Watts 21 MIN, 6 SEC

August 12, 1965, was Day Two of the Watts Riots. KCRW's Saul Gonzalez has the background on how they began. Then we speak with two people who were on the scene to find out what has changed and what has stayed the same. 

Guests:
Gary Orfield, University of California, Los Angeles (@CRPatUCLA)
Robert Farrell, Los Angeles City Council (1974-1991)
Cynthia Gonzalez, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (@cdrewu)

More:
McCone Commission

'Straight Outta Compton' Reminds LA of Its Past 7 MIN, 45 SEC

Years after the Watts Riots, the City of Compton became synonymous with poverty, street gangs and rampant violence. It has changed, too. But Friday is the opening day of the new film, Straight Outta Compton — about the West Coast rap group NWA — back in the day.

David Weinberg's report is part of KCRW's Below the Ten series. The series is supported by a grant from the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation.

Guests:
David Weinberg, Producer (@randomtape)

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