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FROM THIS EPISODE

LA County Sheriff’s deputies have smartphones to take photographs that can be checked against mug shot databases using facial recognition technology. But there’s no state law protecting civil rights or privacy. Will pictures be limited only to people arrested? What about legal protesters? How long will the photos be kept in sheriff’s department files? We’ll look for some answers.

Also, Democrats in Sacramento are looking at new taxes and fees to finance popular programs… even though state revenues have increased more than expected.

Image: ; Credit: BodyWorn

Facial Recognition – Good Policing or Invasion of Privacy? 15 MIN, 23 SEC

LA Sheriff’s deputies have been taking fingerprints with mobile devices for years. Now, they’re equipped with 126 smartphones and tablets to take pictures of people they encounter out in the field. What does this mean for civilian privacy?

Guests:
Joshua Thai, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department
Dave Maass, Electronic Frontier Foundation (@maassive)
Ali Winston, Center for Investigative Reporting (@awinston)

State Legislators Debate New Taxes 7 MIN, 52 SEC

During the Great Recession, the California legislature cut a lot of popular programs. As the recovery gains momentum, state revenues are increasing even faster than optimists were predicting. But, Governor Brown and Democrats in the Assembly and Senate are still looking for new ways to fund public healthcare, subsidize affordable housing and pay for road repairs.

Chris Megerian reports from the Capitol for the LA Times.

Guests:
Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times (@ChrisMegerian)

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