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FROM THIS EPISODE

California Republicans went where the money was. Democrats supported the tried and true. But the voters also approved a measure designed to take partisanship out of politics. We look at the winners and losers and what to expect between now and November. Also, why LA Unified's parcel tax might have been doomed from the start. On our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, starting on Friday, almost a billion soccer fans will be watching the World Cup for the next month. We look at South Africa's preparations for a sporting event with worldwide cultural impact.

Banner image: Republican gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman delivers a campaign speech to supporters at her primary night party at the Universal Hilton Hotel June 8, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Michal Czerwonka/Getty Images

Producers:
Gary Scott
Darrell Satzman
Christian Bordal

Reporter's Notebook Measure E Goes Down 4 MIN, 37 SEC

A majority of voters in LA Unified supported a parcel tax of $100 a year, but Measure E fell far short of the two-thirds required. It was a long-shot anyway, and there wasn't much of a campaign, according to Howard Blume, education writer for the Los Angeles Times.

Guests:
Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times (@howardblume )

Main Topic GOP Goes for Whitman, Fiorina; Ups, Downs of the Propositions 20 MIN, 21 SEC

Republican Meg Whitman spent almost $90 million to win the Republican nomination for Governor over Steve Poisner, who spent $30 million. Today, Democrat Jerry Brown called that "a billionaire's demolition derby" that set "a national record for excessive spending."  (Tomorrow, we'll talk about the upcoming race for Attorney General.)

Guests:
Carla Marinucci, San Francisco Chronicle (@cmarinucci)
Joe Mathews, Zocalo Public Square (@joemmathews)
Bob Stern, Center for Governmental Studies (formerly)

California Crackup

Joe Mathews

Main Topic World Cup Preparations in South Africa 26 MIN, 40 SEC

With roughly a billion fans expected to watch on TV, the World Cup will be living up to its name. It's been held every four years since 1930, with two exceptions during World War II. The first was in Montevideo, Uruguay, and this is the first on the continent of Africa. South Africa, the host nation, has spent almost $4 billion on preparations.

Guests:
Scott Baldauf, Africa Bureau Chief, Christian Science Monitor
Steven Goff, Soccer Writer, Washington Post
Barry Glendenning, Guardian (@bglendenning)
John Nauright, Director, George Mason University's Academy of International Sport

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