The Long Drawn-out Race in the GOP
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The Long Drawn-out Race in the GOP

Mitt Romney won his home state's popular vote by three points, but Rick Santorum may have won the same number of delegates. Who's got the momentum for Super Tuesday next week in Ohio, Georgia, Oklahoma, Tennessee and six other states? Also, North Korea agrees to halt nuclear program in exchange for US aid, and a new calendar designed to get rid of Leap Year. Would it be less confusing or even more?

Banner image; Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and his wife Ann wave to supporters at a primary night gathering at the Suburban Collections Showplace on February 28, 2012 in Novi, Michigan. Romney celebrated primary victories in Arizona and Michigan. Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Making News

North Korea to Halt Nuclear Program in Exchange for US Aid ()

North Korea has agreed to suspend nuclear weapons tests and uranium enrichment, and to allow international inspectors to monitor its main reactor. In exchange, the US has pledged to ship food aid to the impoverished nation. Selig Harrison, Director of the Asia Program at the Center for International Policy in Washington, and author of Korean Endgame: A Strategy for Reunification and US Disengagement, has visited North Korea eleven times, most recently in 2009.

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Main Topic

Is Mitt Romney a Winner or a Survivor? ()

The Detroit News says, Romney's front-runner status has been "restored." The American Spectator says, "The front runner is bleeding." Mitt Romney won Arizona big time in yesterday's voting, but he took his home state by only three points and the final count may show that Rick Santorum won an equal number of delegates. Now it's on to caucuses in Washington State on Sunday -- and 10 states on Super Tuesday next week -- with more delegates at stake than the total number in contests so far. Did Romney win or did he escape a home-state defeat that could have meant curtains? Does he have the momentum to get by Santorum in Ohio and Newt Gingrich in Georgia? As the process drags on, will it lead to a winner, as it did for the Democrats four years ago, or is the GOP flirting with political disaster?

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Reporter's Notebook

Should the Leap Year Be a Thing of the Past? ()

Today is the day the world is reminded of the flaw in the Gregorian Calendar. It has 365 days a year except for one additional day every four years, and this is it. Is it time for a change? February 29 causes a lot of confusion every four years. Now, an economist and an astrophysicist at Johns Hopkins University have invented a new calendar. Every third month would be 31 days long with the rest all lasting for 30 days -- but there's a catch. An extra week would be needed every five or six years at the end of December. Mark Trumbull is a staff writer at the Christian Science Monitor.

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