Props 30, 38: What Happens to Public Education If They Fail?
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Props 30, 38: What Happens to Public Education If They Fail?

This year's state budget is balanced on the passage of Governor Brown's Proposition 30 in next month's election.  If it fails, there will be massive cuts in K-12 and higher education.  Opponents call that "civic terrorism." Others say, never mind, it's about saving the public schools. We hear what it means from LA to Sacramento and how it compares to another school funding measure, Proposition 38.  Also, remembering Catherine Davis, the 81-year old murder victim who was a loving mother at her "writer's villa" up near the Hollywood sign. On our rebroadcast of today's To the Point, will last night's debate change the momentum of the presidential campaign?

Banner image: stuartpilbrow/flickr

Main Topic

Public Education and Next Month's Election ()

Two measures on next month's statewide ballot would provide new money for public schools.  Proposition 38 is sponsored by LA attorney Molly Munger and backed by the State PTA.  It would increase income taxes on all but the poorest Californians to raise $10 billion a year for K through 12 education. It would also impact higher education in California. Governor Brown's Proposition 30 would raise everybody's sales taxes and income taxes on those earning more than $250,000 a year. This year's budget is balanced on the assumption that Prop 30 will pass. What could happen there if Prop 30 failed to pass?

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Reporter's Notebook

Remembering Hollywood Den Mother Catherine Davis ()

catherine_davis.jpgRecent stories have reported the death of Sons of Anarchy actor Johnny Lewis. He struggled with drugs and mental health issues, and was involved in several criminal cases. The reports have less to say about the 81-year-old landlady he is suspected of killing before he either fell or jumped to his own death from a window in her Los Feliz Hills home. On the website XO Jane, actor and comedian Taylor Negron says Catherine Davis was "a Hollywood legend...a near saint."

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Main Topic

Taking Stock of the First Debate ()

In last night's debate, Mitt Romney was an aggressive challenger, not afraid to accuse a sitting President of not telling the truth. The consensus is that an aggressive Romney won the debate against Barack Obama, a President who was defensive and lacking in energy. We sample early reaction and ask how it might influence the remaining month of a close and hard-fought campaign.

 

 

 

 

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Underwriters

Which Way L.A.? is made possible in part by the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation and the Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation.

 

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