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More than 80 million viewers tuned in for Monday night’s debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, making it the most-watched debate ever. The highlights and lowlights include squabbles over the birther conspiracy, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and who has the more “winning temperament.” What important topics – like immigration – were left out? And what did undecided voters think of the candidates’ performances? Also, just in time for the debate, the FBI released new data on crime in America. The candidates were asked how they would heal the racial divide in America; but to heal it, you first have to acknowledge what caused it – slavery. That’s the subject of Colson Whitehead’s new novel, titled “The Underground Railroad.” Whitehead spoke to Press Play about the actual underground railroad he imagined for the novel. And finally, despite Barney’s Beanery’s intolerant past, West Hollywood – one of the gayest in America – is fighting to save the 89-year-old landmark from a large commercial development.

The highs and lows of the first presidential debate 11 MIN, 26 SEC

More than 80 million viewers tuned in for Monday night’s historic debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump – the most-watched debate ever. The highlights and lowlights include squabbles over who started the birther conspiracy, whether Clinton opposed the Trans-Pacific Partnership before or after Donald Trump already had, and whether police stop and frisk tactics were actually found unconstitutional. Trump claimed to have a more “winning temperament” and questioned whether Clinton has enough stamina to hold the highest office. Plus, Clinton called Trump out for his treatment of former Miss Universe Alicia Machado, whom he reportedly called “Miss Piggy” and “Miss Housekeeping” in the past. What important topics – like immigration – were left out?

Guests:
McKay Coppins, The Atlantic (@mckaycoppins)
Jason A. Johnson, Morgan State University / TheRoot.com (@drjasonjohnson)

More:
Trump Gives Ammunition To Clinton For Future Attack Ads

Did the debate help undecided voters decide? 7 MIN, 14 SEC

What did undecided voters think of the candidates’ performances in Monday’s debate? Well, CBS News filmed a focus group of undecided voters reacting to the debate, and there was plenty of disappointment all around. As many as 15 to 20 percent of voters are still deciding between Clinton and Trump, or plan to vote for a third-party candidate. And it’s a close race, with Clinton ahead by just two percentage points in the latest surveys of likely voters, so those undecided voters could make a big difference this election.

Guests:
Alex Isenstadt, Politico (@politicoalex)
Rebecca Nelson, GQ

More:
Live: Undecided Voters React to Presidential Debate
This Group of Undecided Voters Watched the Debate. They Think Hillary Clinton Won.

Post-debate, separating crime facts from fiction 8 MIN, 29 SEC

Crime was a big topic in Monday night’s debate. Along with other claims about crime, Donald Trump said that almost 4,000 people have been killed in Chicago since President Obama took office, and Hillary Clinton said that violent crime is one half of what it was in 1991. Well, just in time for that debate, the FBI released new data on crime in America. Murders are up across the country, with 10 percent more murders last year than the year before. In Los Angeles, the increase was nearly 9 percent. Other cities saw a much more significant spike, including Baltimore, Chicago and St. Louis..  

Guests:
Inimai Chettiar, NYU

More:
Latest Crime Statistics Released - Increase in Violent Crime, Decrease in Property Crime

Colson Whitehead on his imagined real 'Underground Railroad' 13 MIN, 42 SEC

The Presidential candidates were asked during Monday’s debate about race relations in this nation – specifically, how each candidate would heal the racial divide. But to heal it, you first have to acknowledge what caused it. Namely, slavery. That’s the subject of Colson Whitehead’s new novel, titled “The Underground Railroad.” It follows a teenage slave named Cora to a hard-won freedom from a plantation in Georgia, through and escape via an literal underground railroad. Whitehead spoke to Press Play about that little bit of magical realism.

Guests:
Colson Whitehead, novelist (@colsonwhitehead)

WeHo wants to save Barney's Beanery despite its intolerant past 6 MIN, 12 SEC

Barney’s Beanery in West Hollywood is well-known for its chili and beer, and less known for its controversial past. At some point in the 1950s or ‘60s – the exact date is unclear – a previous owner put up a sign that made it clear that gays were not welcome. The city council forced Barney’s to take the sign down shortly after West Hollywood was incorporated in 1984. Now, somewhat ironically, the city – one of the gayest in America – is fighting to save the 89-year-old landmark from a large commercial development.

Guests:
Chris Nichols, Los Angeles magazine (@ChrisNicholsLA)

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