ON AIR
00:00:00 | 3:02:50

DONATE!

close

FROM THIS EPISODE

One of the founding fathers of Israel, Shimon Peres, has died at the age of 93. Peres did more than any prime minister to shape modern Israel. He created Israel’s defense industry, but also built bridges to a region often hostile to the goals of the Jewish state. In an Op-Ed in the New York Times, Israel’s former foreign minister Tzipi Livni wrote that it would be difficult to imagine Israel’s past without Shimon Peres, and that it will be even harder to imagine its future now that he’s gone.

Then, the board of Wells Fargo will force CEO John Stumpf to give up $41 million in stock options after employees created millions of fraudulent accounts for customers under his watch. Is Stumpf getting off easy?

Also, an unarmed black man was shot and killed by police Tuesday in the San Diego suburb of El Cajon. There is bystander cellphone footage of the incident which will likely be made public. We’re exposed to video of police killing people like never before – on TV and social media – but at what cost?

Next, a new Netflix documentary looks at the Amanda Knox case from all sides. Was she a remorseless killer with the face of an angel, or an innocent young woman convicted by bad policing and the unscrupulous press?

And finally, Elon Musk wants to start manned missions to Mars by 2022. What will real-life on Mars be like?

Photo courtesy of Sebastian Derungs 

Peres protege Tzipi Livni mourns the man who shaped modern Israel 8 MIN, 8 SEC

One of the founding fathers of Israel, Shimon Peres, has died at the age of 93. For more than sixty years, Peres helped build Israel into an international power. He was Prime Minister twice and served as president of the country from 2007 to 2014. Peres is credited with creating Israel’s defense industry, and was the main force behind the development of nuclear weapons in Israel. But while he was fortifying the defense of Israel, he was also building bridges to a region often hostile to the goals of the Jewish state. Peres shared a Nobel Peace Prize with Yasser Arafat for negotiating the 1993 Oslo Accords, the deal that made way for the PLO to take power in Gaza. In an Op-Ed in the New York Times, Israel’s former foreign minister Tzipi Livni wrote that it would be difficult to imagine Israel’s past without Shimon Peres, and that it will be even harder to imagine its future now that he’s gone.

Is Wells Fargo CEO Stumpf getting off easy? 8 MIN, 43 SEC

Wells Fargo’s board will force CEO John Stumpf to give up $41 million in stock options. Wells Fargo employees created millions of fraudulent accounts for customers without their knowledge under Stumpf’s watch, crossing all kinds of ethical boundaries, not to mention being illegal. So for Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren, that financial punishment does not go far enough. Warren thinks Stumpf should resign and face criminal charges. But remember when Wall Street banks decimated the entire American economy? None of those CEOs were arrested or forced to give up their millions.

Guests:
Gretchen Morgenson, New York Times (@gmorgenson)

Are videos desensitizing us to police shootings of black men? 8 MIN, 45 SEC

An unarmed black man was shot and killed by police Tuesday in the San Diego suburb of El Cajon. Police there don’t wear body cams, but a woman working at a nearby drive-thru recorded a video of the incident with her cellphone, which she voluntarily turned over to police. The San Diego County District Attorney’s office requires footage of officer-involved shootings be made public. El Cajon police say they’ll withhold the footage for now pending their investigation. But when the video is eventually released, it will appear on people’s news feed or television screen. Whether it’s official dash cam footage or a livestream on Facebook, we’re exposed to video of police killing people like never before. At what cost?

Guests:
Jamil Smith, journalist (@JamilSmith)

New Netflix doc examines the Amanda Knox case from all sides 15 MIN, 9 SEC

In 2007, a young student named Meredith Kercher was found brutally murdered in the picturesque hill town of Perugia, Italy. The events that followed would become one of the most salacious, sensationalized stories in modern history. At the center of it all was a beautiful, young American student named Amanda Knox. After trial by press and the Italian courts, including two separate guilty verdicts, Knox and her boyfriend at the time of the crime were ultimately exonerated by the Italian Supreme Court. An Italian man remains in prison for the crime, but to this day, many people remain divided about Amanda Knox. Was she a remorseless killer with the face of an angel, or an innocent young woman convicted by bad policing and the unscrupulous press? A new Netflix documentary takes a look at the case from all sides.

Guests:
Rod Blackhurst, director (@rodblackhurst)
Brian McGinn, director (@brimcgi)

What would life on Mars be like? 6 MIN, 28 SEC

Life on Mars may be more than a David Bowie song in the near future if SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has his way. Musk announced his plan Tuesday to start manned missions to Mars by 2022. An entire self-sustaining colony of people living on Mars, he said, would take 40 to 100 years. There are plenty of feasibility questions bouncing around since Musk’s announcement, but what would life on Mars be like? Earlier this year, researchers with the University of Hawaii at Manoa finished a yearlong simulated Mars mission, in which six people lived in a two-story dome on top of a volcano for 365 days.

Guests:
Bryan Caldwell, Project Manager

Subscribe to the 5 Things To Do newsletter

Never miss the best of what to do with your free time.

 

More From Press Play with Madeleine Brand

LATEST BLOG POSTS

Latest From KCRW

View Schedule

Events

View All Events

iTUNES SPOTIFY
AMAZON RDIO
FACEBOOK TWITTER

Player Embed Code

COPY EMBED